All posts by africawildsafaris

What is in My Safari Camera Bag?

When I prepare to lead a safari group, I pack my safari photography kit with the minimal amount of equipment. With airline restrictions and limited space for bags in vehicles, I choose a medium sized bag and an assembly of lenses which will give me a good coverage range for the most likely subjects.
I choose a small to medium sized bag and pack carefully
I choose a small to medium sized bag and pack carefully
When I arrive at the lodge, by bag contains everything I need for the whole trip.  Each day I reconfigure my bag to hold just what I need for that day and location.

 For a Game Drive

The Bag:  Guru Gear Kiboko 22L+ with butterfly closure for quick access either side
Canon EOS 5D Mark IV with LensCoat body bag
Canon EOS 5D Mark 3  with LensCoat body bag
Canon EF 400mm f/4 DO IS II USM Lens with Really Right Stuff LCF-52 foot and lensCoat protective cover.
Canon Extender EF 1.4x III
Canon EF 100-400 F4.5-5.6L IS II USM lens with Really Right Stuff LCF-54 foot
Canon EF 24-105 f4 IS USM lens
Nikon 10×42 Monarch 5 Binocular
Black Rapid RS-4 camera strap
Point and Shoot pocket camera
Extra camera batteries and charger
Extra memory cards
Head lamp
Hydro Flask water bottle ( 621 ml )

My camera and lenses for a day on safari game drive

 Sometimes with me on a Game Drive:

 For a Night Drive

 Canon Speedlite 580EX II with Visual Echoes FX3 Better Beamer

For Most Game Drive Vehicles

Gitzo monopod ( GM2541 ) with Really Right Stuff tilt monopod head ( MH-01) with lever release clamp
Read “Monopod: The Right Camera Support for Safari”

For times when we will get out of the vehicle

Gitzo tripod ( GT2531 ) w/ Really Right Stuff ballhead ( BH-40) with screw-knob style quick-release clamp w/ bubble level
Wimberly SK-100 sidekick gimbal head
Canon timer remote controller ( TC-80N3 )
This tripod setup is also perfect for capturing the wondrous night time starscape; capturing images of star trails and the Milky Way.

 Extra Lens

Canon EF 16-35mm f/2.8 II USM Lens
Safari bag side view
This bag has a laptop compartment, rain cover, water bottle holder, and other compartments.

  Items that travel on the trip with me but stay back at the lodge

Nexto DI ND2730 card reader and portable storage device -for doing backup
 Lexar Professional USB 3.0 duel-slot card reader
 13” Macbook pro
How Often will I need the Big Lens?
I took a look at the metadata in my Adobe Lightroom catalogue to see how many images I take with each of my safari lenses.
I reviewed this data after I had culled and rated my photos so this is a curated collection of just the “keepers” .
Please keep in mind that  this data is from my South Africa safaris which combine private reserves and Kruger National Park and may not be reflective of other safari destinations or tours.
Safari Overall
Lens                % of images
16 – 35mm              4%
24 – 105mm         14%
100 – 400mm      58%
400mm                   24% (with extender EF1.4 x 3)
Images Taken in Kruger National Park
16 – 35mm              5%
24 – 105mm           3%
100 – 400mm     53%
400mm                  39% (with extender EF1.4 x 3)

From this, it shows that subjects in Kruger can be further away.  We also tend to see some special bird species in Kruger.

 My best advice:
Keep your camera bag streamlined with a thoughtful selection of lenses.  Use a smaller camera bag because it will fit better in the vehicles and save your shoulders while carrying it.  Less hassles in the airport too.

A Collection of my Best Safari Photo Stories

A Collection of some of my favorite Safari Story Posts

A safari is an adventure and like all adventures it is full of stories and special moments.

With or without a camera, it is those stories and having been there in that moment that make the vivid memories.  The great photographs enhance and help tell the story.

Over the years of leading safaris, my guests and I have been present for many moments which culminate great stories.  I have told many of these stories here in my blog.  Here is a collection of my best African safari stories.



Stories from our 2017 September Safaris – One safari is One hundred stories

Learning to be a Leopard:  A young cub must quickly learn to drag a kill up a tree and eat it up there.

A newborn elephant:  We were present to celebrate a birth with the family herd. Just an hour old it was a very special encounter

Lions Hunting Buffalo: From the planning to the (failed) execution of the plan: we were there to see and photograph the exciting event

Safari Stories: From my September Photography Safaris

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While staying on the Sabi Sands Reserve we take the time to see life through the eyes of a leopard: patrolling territory, resting on a good vantage point, planning the hunt, guarding a meal up a tree.

Safari Story: The Life of a Leopard

 

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When a predator makes a kill and settles down for a meal, it is an invitation for many different players to come to the party:  the hyenas who hope to steal it, vultures who want their share, jackals who just want to sneak a small meal without being noticed, and others.

A Dinner Party in the Bushveld

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Giraffes seem gentle and passive but violent fights break out between the males. We were close enough to get some great photos of a serious battle over rank.

A Photo Safari Story: Giraffe Battles

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Many vultures will show up to a kill sight. Of the many species, each has a specialized function and morphology at the carcass. Some vulture species can not eat without another species to first do their part.

Safari Story: Which Vulture Eats Last?

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A game drive with spent with elephants will result in many stories. We get to see and photograph so many behaviors and elements of their daily life.  We gain insight into their gestures and habits.

Elephant Images and Stories

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Hyenas have a a social structure that is easy to observe when we visited an active den.  As we sat and watched we were treated to cubs at play and a juvenile left in charge.

Morning at the Hyena Den : A Safari Story

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The  wonderful Sabi Sands Reserve treated us to leopard and lion cubs as well as other young wildlife.

Being Young in the Bushveld: Photographing cubs in Sabi Sands Reserve

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Safari highlights this time include big herbivores, big cats who seemed to be posing for portraits, some rare species, and humorous moments.

Favorite Moments from our 2nd Group Safari

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Leopard cubs at play, male rhinos fighting, baby hyena cubs, and some very impressive male lions with their kill, funny elephants, and more.

Favorite Moments from My May 2016 Safaris

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This season we had some usual sightings, following a leopard on his rounds, hyena family life, local conservation efforts, special encounters without leaving the lodge.

Favorite Moments from our September 2016 Safaris

 

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Safari Story: An Afternoon at the Elephant Mud Bath

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Safari Diary: Our First Game Drives with Rhinos, Lions, and More

 

Safari Stories: From my September Photography Safaris

To Go on Safari is to Return with  Hundreds of Stories: Predator vs Prey,  Survival, and Cooperation among Wildlife

Learning to be a Leopard

The Sabi Sands Reserve is famous for its resident leopars.  Our guests were  treated to a 4 leopard afternoon game drive.

An older female leopard called – Ingrid Dam – was watching her cub (unnamed) eating an Impala kill up in a tree, it was having a difficult time eating in the tree because of the position of the kill. The Impala kill and the young cub fell out of the tree.  We knew and the leopards knew there were hyenas nearby wanting to steal this meal should the opportunity arise.  Was the mother going to come down and take the kill back  up the tree for her cub?  We watched and waited.  Though the cub seemed to be asking for help, mother decided on tough love and stayed in the tree watching  as the cub learned to drag the impala kill back up the tree.   It was a hard and physically challenging lesson to learn, but the cub had succeeded for the first time to save his meal from those who would steal it away.  The effort involved with dragging a kill up a tree is the leopard’s way of out maneuvering scavengers.

mother and cub leopard
Mother leopard is watching her cub learn to eat and manipulate a carcass up a tree
leopard in a tree with kill
The cub looses control of the dead impala and they both tumble from the tree.

 

leopard cub
After the cub and the carcass fell out of the tree, he looks to his mother to see if she will help take the kill back up the tree

 

leopard in a tree
Mother leopard watches her cub struggle to take the kill back up the tree

As New as it Gets – A Newborn Elephant

infant elephant

We were on a game drive on a private reserve near Kruger enjoying some great lions, a buffalo herd, and a leopard up a tree when we had a radio call from another safari vehicle about a great sighting.  We hurried over to find it was a newborn elephant calf.  At first we could not see the little one since the calf was hidden among the large legs of the mother, her sisters, and the herds older children.  They were all vocalizing and moving in small, strange movements as if dancing or chanting.  The mother was throwing dust on herself and the calf.  Soon the crowd parted and we could see the newborn.  Cute, wrinkly, and very unsteady on the feet, it was obvious the calf had only been standing for mere minutes.  We were very close and felt very privileged that the herd let us be this close and share their joy at the new arrival.  The calf tottered and fell a few times and we worried until the little one struggled to stand again.

Infant elephant
The infant has alot of growing to do

The next week, we had wonderful continuity when we spotted the herd again.  It was wonderful to see the infant prospering, healthy, and nursing.

infant elephant

The Unicorn of Safari Experiences: Lions Hunting Buffalo

It was our last game drive on the last day of safari and getting to be the time to turn around and head back to the lodge.  It was a great drive, but about to get even better.  We spotted several female lions concentrating on a medium sized herd of buffalo.

Lions hunting buffalo
Planning the attack – the lionesses take position at angles to the herd

It appeared the plan was to slowly move into positions around the herd to separate certain buffalo.  The lions separately made their way around the buffalo herd. Suddenly something goes wrong  – one of the lions must have blundered – and the buffalo started to run.   Wait a minute; they are not running away, they are charging the lions!  One of them was running for their life straight toward us.

Lions Hunting Buffalo
The buffalo turn on the lions and attack. The lions flee for their lives
Lions attack buffalo
The buffalo start to stampede

It is hard for lions to give up when things do not go to plan.  Some of the pride continued to run with the stampeding buffalo to see if there could still be a chance to salvage the hunt.  It was not to be.

Still, it took a long time before the lionesses could let this one go – they continued to watch the buffalo herd move out of reach.

Lions hunting buffalo
One of the Lionesses can not give up on the hunt and keeps watching the buffalo hoping for an opening

As I look through my images, my memory goes back to watching the events  unfold in front of me.  They are much more than the  best image: it is the dozen images before and after that one great image that make up the safari stories that I will tell my friends and family.  While images help to make the story real; nothing compares to having been there and witnessing it live.

Contact us about a safari  or with any questions about choosing, preparing for, and going on a safari.  It is just my wife and I but we correspond with all inquiries personally.

Or just join our newsletter list so you get trip dates, specials, Safari Reports.

Contact form and News signup

 

 

 

 

Whale Sharks 2017 – Amazing Encounters at Isla Mujeres Mexico

Whale Sharks Season 2017

My whale shark season started down in Xcalak, Mexico just south of Cancun  where I did something really unique: got in the shallow water with American Crocodiles.!  We survived and some of us came back north to Isla Mujeres for an opposite experience swimming with gentle giants in the open water.

( interested in the Crocodiles for next year?)

swim with whale sharks in Mexico
My 1st group of excited guests ready to swim with whale sharks

A Very Good Season

Isla Mujeres is fun as always with some new restaurants to try and all the old favorites.  It seems like there is a new whale shark or marine conservation themed mural going up each year.

whale shark mural
One of the colorful murals in Isla Mujeres honoring the whale sharks
Isla Mujeres, Mexico
A view of the northern end of the Isla Mujeres. We stay at a hotel just down the beach from the pyramid shaped one

The weather was settled with clear skies and beautiful water conditions for photography.  Each morning we would board the boat and head out to where the captains estimated the aggregation would be – it can move overnight depending on wind, currents, and activity of the plankton food mass.   We had no trouble finding them in short order.

whale shark at the surface
A whale shark swims to our boat as it feeds with other whale sharks on a giant patch of plankton

This year I photographed with my Canon 5D IV and EF 15mm Fisheye f2.5

whale shark at the surface
A whale shark slowly swims while feeding at the surface

We would have several good “drops” into the water by mid morning.  Often we could follow one individual and when they got ahead of us just stay in place because another whale shark or two was on its way straight to us.  If none where nearby, the captain would come pick us up and take us back into the action and drop us again.

 

Occasionally we would get into an area with other boats of guests taking turns at swimming.  No matter, because we could take a break while they had their chance then soon packed up to return to the mainland.  We were out early and would stay late so we had plenty of time.  By mid afternoon we were usually the only boat remaining.  Some private time!

private charter for Whale Sharks
One of our boats ready to take us out
A sign at the docks explaining the rules and feeding of the whale shark

Giant Manta Rays

We would keep watch for mantas and would devote some time to looking for them either on our way to and from or when we needed a break form the whale sharks.  We found them several times and had a good in water session with one of the groups of mantas.  It is always harder to find mantas since they do not always feed on the surface and they do not have the large fins showing above water like the whale sharks to give them away.

swim with manta ray Isla mujeres
A lucky encounter with a giant manta ray

A Great Trip Out of the Water Too

We would return to the island in the late afternoon.  It was great to relax in or by the pool before changing and having a bit of technology time.  We had so many nice places to choose from for meals, all a short walk from the hotel.

The pool at our beachside hotel
whale shark bottle feeding
A whale shark goes vertical to do what they call “bottle feed” by pumping massive amounts of water into its mouth while staying stationary

The food and atmosphere on Isla Mujeres is wonderful and really makes this a great getaway.  It all ended too soon:  this was exceptional season for the whale sharks.

I want to thank all of the wonderful and interesting people who were my guests this year.  They made it so much fun and I enjoyed conversations with them and helping them with their photography.

Swim with whale shark small group charter
My 2nd group of guests for the whale shark swim

I always leave looking forward to next visit

see my dates for next year

Whale Sharks 2016

Swim with Sailfish and Baitballs at Isla Mujeres

American Crocodiles in Mexico

Scuba with American Crocodiles in Chinchorro, Mexico

Photographing American Crocodiles at Banco Chinchorro, Quintana Roo, Mexico (Cancun area)

With Reef diving at Chinchorro

This is a place few people have been to and a chance to see and photograph pristine Caribbean reefs and also get close to the rare and endangered American Crocodile

Visit my website
photographing crocodiles in Chinchorro
Photographers get in the water 2 at a time with a guide providing lookout and safety
crocodile adventure
My Group of photographers arrives at the fish hut at Chinchorro Atoll

Summary:

Chinchorro Atoll (Banco Chinchorro Biosphere Reserve) is the best place in the world to get close to American crocodiles. Located south of Cancun, Mexico and near the Belize border. The Banco Chinchorro Biosphere Reserve is the largest stand – alone reef in the Northern hemisphere and one of the healthiest. Currently only 1,928 hectares of the 144k hectares are zoned for diving and fewer than one thousand divers get to see these remote and unspoiled dive sites per year. It teems with fish and other sea life, and contains more than 100 shipwrecks as well as the largest population of American crocodiles found in the Americas.

Chinchorro Atoll home to crocodiles
The fishing huts at Chichorro Atoll, 3 hours off shore of Xcalak, Mexico
American Crocodile
A croc swims toward us to see whats going on at the fish hut

This July, myself and 6 guests traveled on a unique adventure to see American Crocodiles and dive these beautiful and remote reefs. This is a safe encounter with guides who have done years of experimentation and careful planning to make this safe. Our outfitter and guides in Xcalak: XTC Dive Center,  were the first operator to organize croc encounters in Chinchorro and they remain the only dive operator with an official concession. They are committed to sustainable tourism and conservation.

We  started out at the beautiful beachside resort in Xcalak for some amazing dives. The reefs are healthy and colorful with many fish.  Some dives we encountered turtles.  Manatees are resident and we were lucky enough to have a visit from one while on a dive.

The dives are  shallows and some deep walls covered in healthy sponges and large stands of black coral. There are several wrecks and plenty of large and small fish species.

Reef dive at Xcalak

Our Hotel at Xcalak

 

On the Chinchorro Banks, we stayed in utilitarian fishing huts on stilts over the shallow waters in a lagoon surrounded by the reefs: 36 nautical miles off shore and across from Xcalak, Mexico.   (2 -4 hours boat ride)

fishing huts Chichorro crocodiles
The fish hut. Others in the area are still actively used by fishermen
fishing huts Chinchorro
Inside the rustic fish huts showing our hammocks which were outfitted with mosquito nets

Each morning we dive and while taking in the pristine reefs and marine life, we hunt lionfish. There is a duo purpose in this; to help eliminate the invasive lionfish population and to get food to attract the crocs. Guests are also invited to participate in the spear fishing of the lionfish and will be equipped and taught the safest techniques.

photographing crocodiles in Chinchorro Mexico
a photographer gets pictures of a relaxed croc

This is a remote adventure at its best: The fisherman’s’ hunts have no wifi, cell phone, mobile services, no running water, only marine toilets, and 2 or more hours from shore. Guests and I slept in hammocks in the huts and delicious food was prepared and cooked by our boat captains with the aide of a small generator and ice storage chests (all food must be transferred out with us). We also  had the chance to buy fresh catch from passing fishermen to make a special, though rustic feast.

feeding lion fish to crocodiles
Our guide empties out our lionfish captured on our dive. they will be bait for the crocs

At Chinchorro, we are surrounded by water and 700 American crocodiles and a few fishermen. We photograph the crocs when they show up at midday (after they warm up) in the 1.2m deep water around our huts. We are able to maintain a level of safety even when we are getting up close due to the experience of our guides. A safety diver and guide are nearby with a pole to ward off any advances from excited crocodiles.  We took turns two at a time. We had between 1 and 5 crocs close by with still more in the area during our sessions Generally they are extremely well behaved and tolerant of divers getting close. They are rewarded with the captured lionfish.

photograph crocodiles in Mexico

swim with crocodiles in Mexico

 

The Whale Sharks were Extra Special this year

 

We spent 4 days on the water and 5 nights on Isla Mujeres.  Always a fun place with great food, we had nonstop whale shark encounters to keep us busy on our 4 days on the water.  We also had a few manta sightings and 1 good photography session with them.

swim with whale sharks
whale shark swims underwater with mouth wide open to feed. front view

Find out more about the whale shark portion of the trip: Whale Sharks 

and my Trip Log

Ready to Jump in Next Year?

If ancient reptiles and remote adventure is calling to you, get more information on price and availability from Gregory Sweeney at www.GregorySweeney.com

Trip Specifics

Included

2 Days scuba diving (2 tank dives) in Xcalak in the Reef National Marine Park

3 days snorkel with crocodiles at Banco Chinchorro Biosphere Reserve

4 nights hotel  in Xcalak (we keep our rooms while at crocs)

2 nights accommodation in Chinchorro in rustic/ basic fishing huts

Morning dives at Banco Chinchorro Biosphere Reserve to gather invasive lionfish

Tanks, weights, dive master, guide at Chinchorro

All meals while at Chinchorro Atoll

Breakfast and Lunch while in Xcalak

Transfers to/from Cancun Airport ( or other location TBD – 6 hour journey)

 

All fishing huts are shared and we sleep in hammocks.

Itinerary

 

July 19 – 24 Whale Shark photography adventure on Isla Mujeres
July 24 Transfer to Xcalak
July 25 2 dives on reefs
July 26 Transfer by boat to Chinchorro Day 1 Crocodile Encounter at Fishing Huts – 3 hour boat ride
July 27 Day 2 Crocodile Encounter – morning dives for lion fish – night 2 at Fishing Huts
July 28 Day 3 Crocodile Encounter – morning dives for lion fish – afternoon return to Xcalak
July 29 reef diving, Xcalak
July 30 Transfer back to Cancun area

Limited spaces – contact me with questions or to reserve your space

info@gregorysweeney.com

http://www.gregorysweeney.com

Correcting an Underwater Image Taken Without Flash

My underwater image of a tiger shark swimming over eel grass needed some processing to make it into something worthy of the cover to Underwater Photographer Magazine Issue #97

Here is how I used Adobe Lightroom  to get it ready for the cover.

Images taken underwater without a flash will have a color cast due to the loss of the red spectrum of  light as it travels through water.

This is a method I use to process my photos that adds back in some of the red and corrects for exposure.  I prefer to leave a bit of a blue cast to the images – they are depicting underwater after all. The trick is to correct it to a point between what your brain saw during the dive and what is technically “perfect” according to the color values.

I use the tools in Adobe Lightroom to do the initial work: they are great tools and easy to use.  I might move later into Photoshop to utilize layers for adjustments to specific areas taking advantage of layers, masks, etc only offered in Photoshop. I definitely will do more detailed work on the image before printing it.

By the way, Lightroom tools are the same as in Camera Raw, but I find LR’s presentation of them easier and I have the bonus of all the organization tools in LR.

The Method

Analyze then Correct Exposure

The first step is to optimize the exposure.  I like to eliminate the distraction of color so I can really analyze what needs to be brighter, darker, and more contrasted.  To do this I temporarily desaturate the image to black and white using the Saturation Slider (Basic Panel under Presence)

 

Desaturate image
To concentrate on the Exposure and Contrast, convert to Black and White (desaturate)

 

Now it is time to analyze the image:  The Histogram is the first step.  According to the graph, there are clear shadows, midtones, and highlights,  but the whole image is too dark: there are barely any areas registering on the right hand (bright) side of the graph.

Exposure: I move the Exposure slider up until the lightest bits of water  read around 62 (pass the curser over areas and read the numbers under the histogram).  The overall change was +.55

In Lightroom the group of tools under Exposure (Highlights, Shadows, Whites, Blacks) are adjustments with smart logic behind them that helps the tool adapt and decide what is “whites” or “blacks” in this specific image.

Curve adjustment tool
Pick up the Curve Adjustment Tool and pass it over the image to read exposure values and see it on the Curve graph

For this purpose they are not doing exactly what I want so I will try the tools under ToneCurve first. Tone Curve is a degree more sophisticated and gives me the option of defining what I want to be considered Highlights, etc.  In this tool, Highlights, Lights, Darks, and Shadows are marked by regions on the tone graph.  I want to adjust the pointers to change the default “definitions” of Highlights, etc.

Curve adjustment
The image after a Curves adjustment

The dark edges of the fins  need some contrast between them and the lighter colored body. To do this I first measure the value of the darkest areas watching where on the graph this area registers by picking up the tool at the top left of the ToneCurve (“adjust the tone curve directly”). I want to define everything darker than the “spots” of the body as “shadow”  so I move the marker at the bottom of the graph over to the this spot on the graph.  Now the Darks tab needs moved to the left. Using the slider for Darks you can detect what it is adjusting – I want it to just do the spots on the body and tones on the fins.  Same with the Lights tab. Lights should be  working on everything light except the shark’s belly and some of the sand and fish.  I have now defined my exposure areas. It is time to make the adjustments.

Now I add a touch of the Clarity slider to pop the midtone contrast – this really brings out the stripes on the tiger shark.

Local adjustment brush
Adjustment brush used to brighten whites and highlights on the shark’s belly and face

For spot exposure corrections, Lightroom  has a Radial Filter tool which can brighten or darken an oval area in the same manner as a graduated filter or a free form brush type tool that can “paint” on adjustments.  I find the radial  tool better and easier to use than the Adjustment brush.

Correcting Color Using White Balance and HSL  Panel Controls

return color
The image has better contrast but still a color cast

Everything is brighter and more contrasted,  the colors look  more intense, but the color cast is still there.  I use the White Balance eyedropper tool and pass it over the image.  You want to choose a place that Should Be either black, white, or neutral grey.  In the Navigation (on the left fly out panel) window it shows you a preview of the white balance correction if you click in that space. When I choose a spot on the belly of the shark it makes the correction, but it is too much for my taste. After the correction,  I back off the sliders under White Balance a little bit back to the left toward the original cool tones.

White Balance adjustment
Use the White Balance tool on the shark’s chin – the change is too extreme but we will adjust it down
back off white balance adjustment
back off the White Balance adjustment by moving sliders back toward blue and green

Now I have the problem of the water not having as nice of a color – it has gone a bit dull –  so I go down to the panel labeled HSL/Color/B&W tools.  I like the presentation of the tool that they label Color,  so click on where it says Color and the tool changes to show each color and all three characteristics under it: Hue, Saturation, and Luminance .

Dropping Saturation on the Aqua slider a bit helps  the  color cast and increasing the Luminance to +20 helps the contrast as well.  On the Blue slider I increase the Saturation to make the blue water pretty again and then a decrease of the Luminance darkens the water and makes it a richer tone with more contrast to the whole image.  I also push the Hue of the blue up a tiny bit  without going too much or the water becomes purple. Since there is quite a bit of green in the image, I darken then Luminance on the green channel, desaturate it a touch then shift the Hue slightly to the yellow side of green.

Color adjustment HSL panel
The HSL color adjustment panel and adjustments to Aqua (desaturate), Blue (darken and move toward purple) and Green

A few final touches:  use the adjustment brush on the shark with some desaturation and white balance adjustment to take some Aqua/Blue out of the shark.  Also edit the first adjustment to the white belly and chin that you did earlier to add in desaturation to move the white closer to white.  The final adjustment is a tiny bit of the Dehaze tool.  This bumps up the contrast and intensifies the colors.

Dehaze adjusment
Final image with a small Dehaze adjustment and a little Post Crop Vignette

You can also add a bit of   Post Crop Vignette to darken the edges.

 

Also See:

Tiger Shark & Hammerhead Dive 2017

Using the Shadows / highlights command in Photoshop

Tiger Shark and Hammerhead Trips for 2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

Favorite Moments from the May 2017 Safaris

My two May 2017 safaris were filled with special wildlife encounters, good weather, good company with some really terrific guests.  I have presented below what I felt were themes present in each safari that made it special.

hyena drinking
A hyena gets a drink after a meal
open safari vehicle
Photographing from the open safari vehicle
Learn about my Photo Safaris in South Africa on my website:  http://www.AfricaWildSafaris.net

The Magic Effects of Africa:

I was delighted to have families and friends traveling together among my photo safari guests.  They were fun and engaging and quickly fell under the spell of the South African bushveld thrilling at  the huge expanse of stars at night, and the way South Africa and the wildlife had a relaxing and healing effect.  Everyone enjoyed the tree houses and the fun and uniquely African touches like outside showers featured at the lodges.

bush babies
Bush Babies often nest in thatch roof and are seen each evening as they leave

Conservation and Education

Our guests are always very interested in learning about wildlife conservation and our rangers, guides, and hosts  tell them the real story behind poaching in our area, wildlife rehabilitation, national parks, and how wildlife reserves operate.  We want our guests to understand the animals they see and their role in a healthy environment.  Also, it is necessary to understand the challenges faced by wildlife in South Africa.  Our guests were so moved by a lion and rhino poaching presentation that we invited the founders of Flying for Rhinos to detail the work they do to help anti-poaching efforts.  They returned with plans to have fundraisers to help this organization. They also were delighted to see several wild white rhinos in Kruger and were able to photograph a very rare encounter with a black rhino.

Black Rhino
A young black rhino bull challenges our vehicle
White Rhino in South Africa
White Rhino
Vulture feeding
At the wildlife rehab centre a guest learns about the role of vultures and gets up close to a bird undergoing treatment for poisoning

Getting Close

Our guests were surprised how close we can get to the animals:  My longest lens is a 400mm,  but I use my 70 – 200mm or 100 – 400mm  for most images.  Our drivers know their reserves very well and can track prides of lions, rhino, and herds of buffalo day to day.  When we find the animals we can get close up and detailed images of elephants, big cats, and giraffes.

wild dogs
A close wild dog encounter
leopard profile
a leopard profile in the late afternoon light

Sometimes we are too close for some of our lenses and have to back off, but we can also get some really great images that isolate different parts of the animal’s anatomy

Lion Paw
Close up of a lion paw
elephant skin
elephant tail and skin texture
elephant and game drive vehicle
getting close to elephants

Behavior and interaction

We highlight the relationships and interactions between species.  When we see buffalo we will also see oxpeckers cleaning parasites off of the buffalo.

buffalo and oxpeckers
oxpeckers remove parasites from the buffalo so they tolerate them even when they clean out the ears.
red billed oxpecker
Oxpeckers also issue warnings when predators approach – they want to protect their food source which are prey animals

We were thrilled to witness an unusual coalition of 5 adult male lions who live, defend territory, and share female pride members.  It was a bit intimidating to be so close to these large and intimidating beasts.

male lions
A coalition of 5 male lions controls this territory

Wildlife Families

We were lucky enough to encounter several prides of lions with cubs.  Most had cubs in a range of ages.  We enjoyed watching and photographing the cubs playing and interacting with their parents.  There were some great moments of a mother’s care and love for her cubs.

lion mother and cub
A mother fakes annoyance at a playful cub
lion cubs playing
A burst of play stops the walk

Young giraffes stayed close to their mothers and baby elephants were kept safely in among the herd by the older females.

Mother and baby giraffe
Mother and young giraffe
baby hyena and mother
A hyena mother brings a meal for the pups

Birds

Birds are very prevalent now that the weather has returned to normal and provided abundant food for them.  We always see the spectacular lilac breasted roller. It lights on branches near the dirt roads so we can get images of this colorful bird with shorter lenses.

We also sighted the large predatory birds; Kori Bustard and secretary bird.

Kori Bustard seen on photo safari
The Kori Bustard is the largest flying bird in Africa
secretary bird
A secretary bird “walking eagle”

Hornbills are charismatic to photograph and we found the less common red billed hornbill and the even more rare grey hornbill.

grey hornbill in South Africa
Grey hornbill has just caught a grasshopper

Beauty

We get great close up portraits of animals, but it is the wide shots that can translate the beauty and mood of South Africa: the sunsetting behind a giraffe as she eats and wildebeest feeding in the early morning fog.

Giraffe at sunset
Giraffe at sunset
wildebeest in the mist
wildebeest moving in the early morning mist

Beauty is also in the small details like dew on a spiderweb.

close up of a spiderweb
Detail of an orb spiderweb

It was a fantastically successful two safari groups with every guest returning with  good images of a huge variety of species: more high quality sightings than they expected .  I want to thank all of the guests who made these trips so much fun with good conversation, nights on the deck watching nocturnal animals, great questions, and most of all  continuing friendships and forming new friendships.  I sincerely hope they can all return again in the future.

Read More on My Blog

Creative Ways to Photograph Elephants

Using the new Lightroom : Dehaze tool on Safari Images

Our 2018 Safari Dates

Safari Diary: First Games Drives with Lions and Rhinos

Photographing Elephants: 10 Ways to be Creative with Elephants

10 Creative Ways to Photograph Elephants

Elephants are frequently our photo subjects while on safari.  Their size, shape, intelligence, and trunk are just a few things that make them great subjects and very interesting.  There are many opportunities for unique, beautiful, and descriptive images of elephants.

Close details

Elephants are very unique in shape and texture. Images showing the whole elephant(s) are great to show the elephant in its environment, but can not describe the all the unique features and details of an elephant. Taking close up images of the trunk in action, tusks, skin, eyes, and ears gives your audience a chance to focus in on details and discover shapes and colors and learn about elephants in more detail.

         

Photographing Elephants
Elephant eye

Using perspective and symmetry

elephant family walks in a line

Elephants come in all sizes and travel in herds so highlight these different sizes and ages in a way that gives geometric order and symmetry to your image. Contrast of size creating perspective lines vanishing into the horizon is a pleasing effect. Elephants will often line up and if you are patient you can grab moments when trunks, ear, etc are pleasingly arranged symmetrically.

Interaction with other elephants

Elephants are social animals and this gives many interaction moments to photograph. Sometimes the golden moment is a hidden detail in a wider image. Cropping can highlight this “picture in a picture” moment between two elephants. Elephants also have greetings, reassuring gestures, and rank showing moves that you can watch and wait for then highlight through cropping and framing the images

A tender moment between mother and calf is hidden inside the wider image

 

Interaction with other species

An elephant chases zebras out of the watering hole

Showing how elephants interact with other species is capturing their role in their environment. Other species feel safe near elephants and trust their strength, awareness, and intelligence. You can photograph mixed herds, birds that groom elephants, and when they assert their dominance.

Showing scale

Obviously their size is a major feature of elephants. Showing large and small elephants together is not always enough to communicate their size. Try to show other animals such as zebra which are a familiar size to your audience to show how large they are. Manmade objects like vehicles are a good contrast as well.

Movement / Behavior

With their unique body form and parts, photographing how the elephant and its parts moves adds another dimension to your illustration of elephants. Also try to isolate and highlight unique behaviors of the elephants such as mock fighting, and the million ways they use their trunks for different things

Take the usual front view and side views to new levels

Front and 3/4

¾ is a flattering angle that has been drilled into us for portraits, but a straight on frame filling front view is eye catching. A creative crop creates interesting negative space and also increases the impact

Side

Elephants have an interesting shape so a side view shows off this shape. Think about negative space and other elements to contrast the rounded lines of the elephant such as straight trees or grass

Rear

Elephant rears are unique and large with great tails. A nicely framed rear shot shows the elephants in and interacting with their environment. Walking off “into the sunset” communicates that these elephants are wild and free.

Personality / Cute Babies

Elephants appear to have individual personalities and we often can see some of ourselves in their movement, behavior, and interaction. Anytime we can photograph this connect to ourselves it makes a more impactful image. They show happiness, companionship, nervousness, and aggravation through their actions and interactions. Capture moments of joy when they are in the water or doing something crazy.

You can see the joy when elephants get into the water
This elephant is using a very short scratching post – we had a good laugh at this

Elephant babies are very cute and are well looked after by their mothers and other herd members: it is not hard to capture intimate moments between mothers and babies.

Shape Silhouette

Sometimes lighting on a safari is challenging, but taking bad lighting and turning it into a silhouette shot can give you a special image. Elephant’s unique shape works very well against a sunset.

 

When you get out on safari and see elephants, get to know them and capture some images that illustrate everything that is fun, interesting, and unique about them.  There are not many subjects so expressive and charismatic.

Other Related Posts

Safari Story: Elephants at the Mudbath

Post Processing: 1 photo 3 ways

Dynamic Black and White Safari Images

Our photo Safaris in 2018

 

Tiger Shark and Hammerhead Dive 2017

Tiger Sharks and Hammerheads Dive Trip in Bahamas

see our trips for 2018  at www.TigerSharkDive.com  and www.GregorySweeney.com

Trip Report 2017

This year was our first year combining Tiger Sharks at Tiger Beach and Hammerheads in Bimini.  Of course we also had the bull sharks, lemons, caribbean reefs sharks.

Hammerhead dive liveaboard in Bahamas
Hammerhead eating some fish
Hammerhead dive in Bimini
Hammerhead in a cloud of fish
Tiger Beach Bahamas
Tiger Shark
Tiger shark diving in Bahamas
Tiger Shark

Tiger Shark

Shark diving
Lemon Sharks attracted to the back of our boat
Bull Shark
Bull Shark
Bull Shark
Bull Shark
MV Dolphin Dream
Our Boat

 

 

Swim with Whale Sharks in Mexico – Great Things About Isla Mujeres

Private charter for whale sharks
Our boat captains are good at dropping us ahead of the moving whale sharks so as to get the front on shots

Isla Mujeres is a great base for your Whale Shark Adventure

After a day out on the water with the Whale Sharks and Mantas, it is great to relax and dry out with a walk around through the streets of Isla Mujeres.  Lined with fun shops and great restaurants, it is safe and full of the festive feeling of Mexico.

Great Places to Eat

After many years of leading Sailfish and Whale Shark trips to Isla Mujeres, I have found some really great restaurants both formal and hole in the wall.  I think I can say I have never had a bad meal here and in fact had many great ones and all at a great or reasonable value.

Here is a few of my favorites:

  • Olivia (Mediterranean and Vegetarian)
  • Pita Amore
  • Jax
  • La Lamida
  • Rooster
  • Rolandi

 

Count the Whale Shark Murals

In the last few years, murals of whale sharks, sailfish, and mantas have sprouted up all over town.  It is a great street photography outing to find and photograph the best all over town.

whale shark mural
One of the colorful murals in Isla Mujeres honoring the whale sharks

Unique Shopping – Bazaar and High End

The colorful shops are full of handmade Mexican items ideal for souvenirs and gifts to take home.

Relaxation Opportunities

For a day off, there are beaches perfect for swimming and sunning: there might even be a hammock with your name on it.  Picture a pool with a view of the beach.  A ride to the south of the island takes you to a park and ruins.  Numerous dive shops will give you opportunities for diving around the island.  The Underwater Statue Museum is a unique experience.

The pool at our beachside hotel
Most come for the unequalled marine wildlife encounters, but Isla Mujeres is a holiday destination by itself.

 

Get details about the trip on our website  My next Whale Shark & Manta Trip
See my whale shark images on my Gallery Website