Category Archives: Photo Safaris

Posts about our safaris, preparing for your safari, African wildlife, and safari guide reports.

Polar Bears in Churchill 2017

Every October and November, polar bears congregate in the Churchill area to await the return of the sea ice and access to their preferred prey: the ringed seal.  This year our trip to Churchill was in late October.  The weather was starting to get snowy, but the ice had not yet formed. Numerous bears were known to be in the area.

Join my 2018 Polar Bear Expedition to Churchill – my last time offering this trip!

Northern Studies Centre
Drone image of the Northern Studies Centre

polar bear photo workshop

We traveled by way of Winnipeg and a flight up to Churchill.  Our group stayed inside the Churchill Wildlife Management Area at the Northern Studies Centre, a research facility that houses the scientists and their research. Each year the Centre welcomes a few visitors such as our group.  While at the Centre we were introduced to the ecofriendly facility, learned of the current research, and had a thorough orientation to polar bears in this region. It is a comfortable facility with meeting rooms, media rooms, a workout room, and we enjoyed the observation deck and night observatory dome. At times we had wildlife sightings from the windows of the Centre: a fox visited daily, a hare, birds, and a bear came close.

polar bear mother and cubs
mother and cubs cross a frozen pond

Our first day out was in a private van which takes us around the town area and bordering wildlife area. We learned about the impact of humans on the polar bears and the steps they take to keep bears from becoming a nuisance around human areas like the dump and in town. We were enlightened about the bear jail and how they trap and release the bears.

bear jail churchill
The building which houses the “bear jail” for nuisance bears around town
bear traps churchill
Bear traps

photographing polar bears

environmental theme mural
Photographing mural art around town

Our next day was spent on a specialized bear tundra vehicle in the Wildlife Management Area.  The vehicle was comfortable and had window we could photograph through as well has the big open back deck for unobstructed photographs.  They move slowly, but there is no other vehicle which can cover this territory without damage to the environment.

male polar bear

bear buggy polar bears
Guests photograph from the windows of the bear vehicle
A vehicle for traveling into the Wildlife Management Area

We had many bear sightings  in the bear vehicle.  We tracked a mother and two cubs for a long time as they advanced to a half frozen creek. Our best encounter was a male bear who took a nap right near our vehicle.  He gave us a great display while he rolled and rubbed.  He changed places and went back to sleep.

arctic hare
An arctic hare
Funny polar bear
A male polar bear strikes some funny poses while scratching and stretching

An arctic hare whose size was surprising gave a good photo opportunity before bounding off. We also found several snowy owls.  Many of the sightings were due to the expert spotting skills of our driver and guide – they knew where to look and positioned the vehicle for great views.

northern lights
We were lucky enough to have Northern Lights for a few hours on a clear evening

Our 2nd night was clear and we were treated to Northern Lights early in the evening.  It was cold but worth the bundling to set up our tripods and cameras to try to capture the magic of the lights.

photographing polar bears
The group gets out and sets up using tripods and the bear comes closer

polar bear photo tour

On our last day we were back with our private van and guide.  We had a great encounter with a male bear who was walking toward our van then crossed the road right in front of us then kept going into the rough. We are able to get out of the van and use tripods.  When the bear went out of range, we changed course to intercept it down the road.

Snowy Owl
Snowy Owl

We had several more snowy owls, ptarmigans, and a fox this afternoon.  Our last encounter of the day happened as the weather turned to blowing snow. A young bear was lying down near at the quarry.  He looked sad as if his mother would not let him follow her anymore.

polar bear photography workshop
A young bear sits high up at the quarry

Our day ended in town at a restaurant and then straight onto the airport and our flight back to Winnipeg.


plane crash

Mounty Moose
Local mascot welcomes guests to Churchill

It was a great trip full of great chances to photograph polar bears and wildlife.  We are grateful for the opportunity to stay at the Northern Studies Centre for a quality yet affordable trip packed with wildlife and photography.


Get information about our next Polar Bears in Churchill Trip


2017 A Year of Wildlife Photography all over the World

This year my photo tours took me all over the world.

Each location yielded great photo opportunities for my guests and many had achieved the fulfillment of a travel dream.

To commemorate the end of 2017, I have chosen these images.

Next year will also be filled with travel, photo tours , wonderful wildlife encounters.


Swim with Sailfish Mexico
Sailfish, Isla Mujeres Mexico

March / April

TIger Shark
Tiger Shark, Bahamas
Great Hammerhead
Great Hammerhead, Bimini Bahamas
Dive with Tiger Sharks
Photographing Tiger Sharks, Bahamas



photograph safari with lions
Lion Cubs at play, Botswana
Photo Safari to South Africa
Elephants, Botswana


Giant Manta Ray
Giant Manta Ray, Isla Mujeres Mexico
Swim with Whale Sharks
Swimming with Whale Sharks, Mexico
Whale Shark
Whale Shark, Mexico


American Crocodile
American Crocodile, Chinchorro, Mexico


Photographing giraffes
Mother and Baby Giraffe, South Africa
photograph Leopards
Leopard, Sabi Sands in South Africa
Photograph Lions in South Africa
Lions hunting buffalo, South Africa


Great White Shark
Great White Shark, Guadalupe
Sea Otter
Sea Otters, Northern California
Mako Shark
Mako Shark, Southern California
Polar Bears in Churchill
Polar Bears, Churchill Canada


Dugong, Philippines


Pygmy Seahorse
Pygmy Seahorse, Anilao Philippines

Underwater Adventures 2018 Newsletter

Underwater Trips Website

My Safaris  Detail


What is in My Safari Camera Bag?

When I prepare to lead a safari group, I pack my safari photography kit with the minimal amount of equipment. With airline restrictions and limited space for bags in vehicles, I choose a medium sized bag and an assembly of lenses which will give me a good coverage range for the most likely subjects.
I choose a small to medium sized bag and pack carefully
I choose a small to medium sized bag and pack carefully
When I arrive at the lodge, by bag contains everything I need for the whole trip.  Each day I reconfigure my bag to hold just what I need for that day and location.

 For a Game Drive

The Bag:  Guru Gear Kiboko 22L+ with butterfly closure for quick access either side
Canon EOS 5D Mark IV with LensCoat body bag
Canon EOS 5D Mark 3  with LensCoat body bag
Canon EF 400mm f/4 DO IS II USM Lens with Really Right Stuff LCF-52 foot and lensCoat protective cover.
Canon Extender EF 1.4x III
Canon EF 100-400 F4.5-5.6L IS II USM lens with Really Right Stuff LCF-54 foot
Canon EF 24-105 f4 IS USM lens
Nikon 10×42 Monarch 5 Binocular
Black Rapid RS-4 camera strap
Point and Shoot pocket camera
Extra camera batteries and charger
Extra memory cards
Head lamp
Hydro Flask water bottle ( 621 ml )

My camera and lenses for a day on safari game drive

 Sometimes with me on a Game Drive:

 For a Night Drive

 Canon Speedlite 580EX II with Visual Echoes FX3 Better Beamer

For Most Game Drive Vehicles

Gitzo monopod ( GM2541 ) with Really Right Stuff tilt monopod head ( MH-01) with lever release clamp
Read “Monopod: The Right Camera Support for Safari”

For times when we will get out of the vehicle

Gitzo tripod ( GT2531 ) w/ Really Right Stuff ballhead ( BH-40) with screw-knob style quick-release clamp w/ bubble level
Wimberly SK-100 sidekick gimbal head
Canon timer remote controller ( TC-80N3 )
This tripod setup is also perfect for capturing the wondrous night time starscape; capturing images of star trails and the Milky Way.

 Extra Lens

Canon EF 16-35mm f/2.8 II USM Lens
Safari bag side view
This bag has a laptop compartment, rain cover, water bottle holder, and other compartments.

  Items that travel on the trip with me but stay back at the lodge

Nexto DI ND2730 card reader and portable storage device -for doing backup
 Lexar Professional USB 3.0 duel-slot card reader
 13” Macbook pro
How Often will I need the Big Lens?
I took a look at the metadata in my Adobe Lightroom catalogue to see how many images I take with each of my safari lenses.
I reviewed this data after I had culled and rated my photos so this is a curated collection of just the “keepers” .
Please keep in mind that  this data is from my South Africa safaris which combine private reserves and Kruger National Park and may not be reflective of other safari destinations or tours.
Safari Overall
Lens                % of images
16 – 35mm              4%
24 – 105mm         14%
100 – 400mm      58%
400mm                   24% (with extender EF1.4 x 3)
Images Taken in Kruger National Park
16 – 35mm              5%
24 – 105mm           3%
100 – 400mm     53%
400mm                  39% (with extender EF1.4 x 3)

From this, it shows that subjects in Kruger can be further away.  We also tend to see some special bird species in Kruger.

 My best advice:
Keep your camera bag streamlined with a thoughtful selection of lenses.  Use a smaller camera bag because it will fit better in the vehicles and save your shoulders while carrying it.  Less hassles in the airport too.

A Collection of my Best Safari Photo Stories

A Collection of some of my favorite Safari Story Posts

A safari is an adventure and like all adventures it is full of stories and special moments.

With or without a camera, it is those stories and having been there in that moment that make the vivid memories.  The great photographs enhance and help tell the story.

Over the years of leading safaris, my guests and I have been present for many moments which culminate great stories.  I have told many of these stories here in my blog.  Here is a collection of my best African safari stories.

Stories from our 2017 September Safaris – One safari is One hundred stories

Learning to be a Leopard:  A young cub must quickly learn to drag a kill up a tree and eat it up there.

A newborn elephant:  We were present to celebrate a birth with the family herd. Just an hour old it was a very special encounter

Lions Hunting Buffalo: From the planning to the (failed) execution of the plan: we were there to see and photograph the exciting event

Safari Stories: From my September Photography Safaris


While staying on the Sabi Sands Reserve we take the time to see life through the eyes of a leopard: patrolling territory, resting on a good vantage point, planning the hunt, guarding a meal up a tree.

Safari Story: The Life of a Leopard



When a predator makes a kill and settles down for a meal, it is an invitation for many different players to come to the party:  the hyenas who hope to steal it, vultures who want their share, jackals who just want to sneak a small meal without being noticed, and others.

A Dinner Party in the Bushveld


Giraffes seem gentle and passive but violent fights break out between the males. We were close enough to get some great photos of a serious battle over rank.

A Photo Safari Story: Giraffe Battles


Many vultures will show up to a kill sight. Of the many species, each has a specialized function and morphology at the carcass. Some vulture species can not eat without another species to first do their part.

Safari Story: Which Vulture Eats Last?


A game drive with spent with elephants will result in many stories. We get to see and photograph so many behaviors and elements of their daily life.  We gain insight into their gestures and habits.

Elephant Images and Stories


Hyenas have a a social structure that is easy to observe when we visited an active den.  As we sat and watched we were treated to cubs at play and a juvenile left in charge.

Morning at the Hyena Den : A Safari Story


The  wonderful Sabi Sands Reserve treated us to leopard and lion cubs as well as other young wildlife.

Being Young in the Bushveld: Photographing cubs in Sabi Sands Reserve



Safari highlights this time include big herbivores, big cats who seemed to be posing for portraits, some rare species, and humorous moments.

Favorite Moments from our 2nd Group Safari


Leopard cubs at play, male rhinos fighting, baby hyena cubs, and some very impressive male lions with their kill, funny elephants, and more.

Favorite Moments from My May 2016 Safaris


This season we had some usual sightings, following a leopard on his rounds, hyena family life, local conservation efforts, special encounters without leaving the lodge.

Favorite Moments from our September 2016 Safaris



Safari Story: An Afternoon at the Elephant Mud Bath


Safari Diary: Our First Game Drives with Rhinos, Lions, and More


Safari Stories: From my September Photography Safaris

To Go on Safari is to Return with  Hundreds of Stories: Predator vs Prey,  Survival, and Cooperation among Wildlife

Learning to be a Leopard

The Sabi Sands Reserve is famous for its resident leopars.  Our guests were  treated to a 4 leopard afternoon game drive.

An older female leopard called – Ingrid Dam – was watching her cub (unnamed) eating an Impala kill up in a tree, it was having a difficult time eating in the tree because of the position of the kill. The Impala kill and the young cub fell out of the tree.  We knew and the leopards knew there were hyenas nearby wanting to steal this meal should the opportunity arise.  Was the mother going to come down and take the kill back  up the tree for her cub?  We watched and waited.  Though the cub seemed to be asking for help, mother decided on tough love and stayed in the tree watching  as the cub learned to drag the impala kill back up the tree.   It was a hard and physically challenging lesson to learn, but the cub had succeeded for the first time to save his meal from those who would steal it away.  The effort involved with dragging a kill up a tree is the leopard’s way of out maneuvering scavengers.

mother and cub leopard
Mother leopard is watching her cub learn to eat and manipulate a carcass up a tree
leopard in a tree with kill
The cub looses control of the dead impala and they both tumble from the tree.


leopard cub
After the cub and the carcass fell out of the tree, he looks to his mother to see if she will help take the kill back up the tree


leopard in a tree
Mother leopard watches her cub struggle to take the kill back up the tree

As New as it Gets – A Newborn Elephant

infant elephant

We were on a game drive on a private reserve near Kruger enjoying some great lions, a buffalo herd, and a leopard up a tree when we had a radio call from another safari vehicle about a great sighting.  We hurried over to find it was a newborn elephant calf.  At first we could not see the little one since the calf was hidden among the large legs of the mother, her sisters, and the herds older children.  They were all vocalizing and moving in small, strange movements as if dancing or chanting.  The mother was throwing dust on herself and the calf.  Soon the crowd parted and we could see the newborn.  Cute, wrinkly, and very unsteady on the feet, it was obvious the calf had only been standing for mere minutes.  We were very close and felt very privileged that the herd let us be this close and share their joy at the new arrival.  The calf tottered and fell a few times and we worried until the little one struggled to stand again.

Infant elephant
The infant has alot of growing to do

The next week, we had wonderful continuity when we spotted the herd again.  It was wonderful to see the infant prospering, healthy, and nursing.

infant elephant

The Unicorn of Safari Experiences: Lions Hunting Buffalo

It was our last game drive on the last day of safari and getting to be the time to turn around and head back to the lodge.  It was a great drive, but about to get even better.  We spotted several female lions concentrating on a medium sized herd of buffalo.

Lions hunting buffalo
Planning the attack – the lionesses take position at angles to the herd

It appeared the plan was to slowly move into positions around the herd to separate certain buffalo.  The lions separately made their way around the buffalo herd. Suddenly something goes wrong  – one of the lions must have blundered – and the buffalo started to run.   Wait a minute; they are not running away, they are charging the lions!  One of them was running for their life straight toward us.

Lions Hunting Buffalo
The buffalo turn on the lions and attack. The lions flee for their lives
Lions attack buffalo
The buffalo start to stampede

It is hard for lions to give up when things do not go to plan.  Some of the pride continued to run with the stampeding buffalo to see if there could still be a chance to salvage the hunt.  It was not to be.

Still, it took a long time before the lionesses could let this one go – they continued to watch the buffalo herd move out of reach.

Lions hunting buffalo
One of the Lionesses can not give up on the hunt and keeps watching the buffalo hoping for an opening

As I look through my images, my memory goes back to watching the events  unfold in front of me.  They are much more than the  best image: it is the dozen images before and after that one great image that make up the safari stories that I will tell my friends and family.  While images help to make the story real; nothing compares to having been there and witnessing it live.

Contact us about a safari  or with any questions about choosing, preparing for, and going on a safari.  It is just my wife and I but we correspond with all inquiries personally.

Or just join our newsletter list so you get trip dates, specials, Safari Reports.

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Favorite Moments from the May 2017 Safaris

My two May 2017 safaris were filled with special wildlife encounters, good weather, good company with some really terrific guests.  I have presented below what I felt were themes present in each safari that made it special.

hyena drinking
A hyena gets a drink after a meal
open safari vehicle
Photographing from the open safari vehicle
Learn about my Photo Safaris in South Africa on my website:

The Magic Effects of Africa:

I was delighted to have families and friends traveling together among my photo safari guests.  They were fun and engaging and quickly fell under the spell of the South African bushveld thrilling at  the huge expanse of stars at night, and the way South Africa and the wildlife had a relaxing and healing effect.  Everyone enjoyed the tree houses and the fun and uniquely African touches like outside showers featured at the lodges.

bush babies
Bush Babies often nest in thatch roof and are seen each evening as they leave

Conservation and Education

Our guests are always very interested in learning about wildlife conservation and our rangers, guides, and hosts  tell them the real story behind poaching in our area, wildlife rehabilitation, national parks, and how wildlife reserves operate.  We want our guests to understand the animals they see and their role in a healthy environment.  Also, it is necessary to understand the challenges faced by wildlife in South Africa.  Our guests were so moved by a lion and rhino poaching presentation that we invited the founders of Flying for Rhinos to detail the work they do to help anti-poaching efforts.  They returned with plans to have fundraisers to help this organization. They also were delighted to see several wild white rhinos in Kruger and were able to photograph a very rare encounter with a black rhino.

Black Rhino
A young black rhino bull challenges our vehicle
White Rhino in South Africa
White Rhino
Vulture feeding
At the wildlife rehab centre a guest learns about the role of vultures and gets up close to a bird undergoing treatment for poisoning

Getting Close

Our guests were surprised how close we can get to the animals:  My longest lens is a 400mm,  but I use my 70 – 200mm or 100 – 400mm  for most images.  Our drivers know their reserves very well and can track prides of lions, rhino, and herds of buffalo day to day.  When we find the animals we can get close up and detailed images of elephants, big cats, and giraffes.

wild dogs
A close wild dog encounter
leopard profile
a leopard profile in the late afternoon light

Sometimes we are too close for some of our lenses and have to back off, but we can also get some really great images that isolate different parts of the animal’s anatomy

Lion Paw
Close up of a lion paw
elephant skin
elephant tail and skin texture
elephant and game drive vehicle
getting close to elephants

Behavior and interaction

We highlight the relationships and interactions between species.  When we see buffalo we will also see oxpeckers cleaning parasites off of the buffalo.

buffalo and oxpeckers
oxpeckers remove parasites from the buffalo so they tolerate them even when they clean out the ears.
red billed oxpecker
Oxpeckers also issue warnings when predators approach – they want to protect their food source which are prey animals

We were thrilled to witness an unusual coalition of 5 adult male lions who live, defend territory, and share female pride members.  It was a bit intimidating to be so close to these large and intimidating beasts.

male lions
A coalition of 5 male lions controls this territory

Wildlife Families

We were lucky enough to encounter several prides of lions with cubs.  Most had cubs in a range of ages.  We enjoyed watching and photographing the cubs playing and interacting with their parents.  There were some great moments of a mother’s care and love for her cubs.

lion mother and cub
A mother fakes annoyance at a playful cub
lion cubs playing
A burst of play stops the walk

Young giraffes stayed close to their mothers and baby elephants were kept safely in among the herd by the older females.

Mother and baby giraffe
Mother and young giraffe
baby hyena and mother
A hyena mother brings a meal for the pups


Birds are very prevalent now that the weather has returned to normal and provided abundant food for them.  We always see the spectacular lilac breasted roller. It lights on branches near the dirt roads so we can get images of this colorful bird with shorter lenses.

We also sighted the large predatory birds; Kori Bustard and secretary bird.

Kori Bustard seen on photo safari
The Kori Bustard is the largest flying bird in Africa
secretary bird
A secretary bird “walking eagle”

Hornbills are charismatic to photograph and we found the less common red billed hornbill and the even more rare grey hornbill.

grey hornbill in South Africa
Grey hornbill has just caught a grasshopper


We get great close up portraits of animals, but it is the wide shots that can translate the beauty and mood of South Africa: the sunsetting behind a giraffe as she eats and wildebeest feeding in the early morning fog.

Giraffe at sunset
Giraffe at sunset
wildebeest in the mist
wildebeest moving in the early morning mist

Beauty is also in the small details like dew on a spiderweb.

close up of a spiderweb
Detail of an orb spiderweb

It was a fantastically successful two safari groups with every guest returning with  good images of a huge variety of species: more high quality sightings than they expected .  I want to thank all of the guests who made these trips so much fun with good conversation, nights on the deck watching nocturnal animals, great questions, and most of all  continuing friendships and forming new friendships.  I sincerely hope they can all return again in the future.

Read More on My Blog

Creative Ways to Photograph Elephants

Using the new Lightroom : Dehaze tool on Safari Images

Our 2018 Safari Dates

Safari Diary: First Games Drives with Lions and Rhinos

Photographing Elephants: 10 Ways to be Creative with Elephants

10 Creative Ways to Photograph Elephants

Elephants are frequently our photo subjects while on safari.  Their size, shape, intelligence, and trunk are just a few things that make them great subjects and very interesting.  There are many opportunities for unique, beautiful, and descriptive images of elephants.

Close details

Elephants are very unique in shape and texture. Images showing the whole elephant(s) are great to show the elephant in its environment, but can not describe the all the unique features and details of an elephant. Taking close up images of the trunk in action, tusks, skin, eyes, and ears gives your audience a chance to focus in on details and discover shapes and colors and learn about elephants in more detail.


Photographing Elephants
Elephant eye

Using perspective and symmetry

elephant family walks in a line

Elephants come in all sizes and travel in herds so highlight these different sizes and ages in a way that gives geometric order and symmetry to your image. Contrast of size creating perspective lines vanishing into the horizon is a pleasing effect. Elephants will often line up and if you are patient you can grab moments when trunks, ear, etc are pleasingly arranged symmetrically.

Interaction with other elephants

Elephants are social animals and this gives many interaction moments to photograph. Sometimes the golden moment is a hidden detail in a wider image. Cropping can highlight this “picture in a picture” moment between two elephants. Elephants also have greetings, reassuring gestures, and rank showing moves that you can watch and wait for then highlight through cropping and framing the images

A tender moment between mother and calf is hidden inside the wider image


Interaction with other species

An elephant chases zebras out of the watering hole

Showing how elephants interact with other species is capturing their role in their environment. Other species feel safe near elephants and trust their strength, awareness, and intelligence. You can photograph mixed herds, birds that groom elephants, and when they assert their dominance.

Showing scale

Obviously their size is a major feature of elephants. Showing large and small elephants together is not always enough to communicate their size. Try to show other animals such as zebra which are a familiar size to your audience to show how large they are. Manmade objects like vehicles are a good contrast as well.

Movement / Behavior

With their unique body form and parts, photographing how the elephant and its parts moves adds another dimension to your illustration of elephants. Also try to isolate and highlight unique behaviors of the elephants such as mock fighting, and the million ways they use their trunks for different things

Take the usual front view and side views to new levels

Front and 3/4

¾ is a flattering angle that has been drilled into us for portraits, but a straight on frame filling front view is eye catching. A creative crop creates interesting negative space and also increases the impact


Elephants have an interesting shape so a side view shows off this shape. Think about negative space and other elements to contrast the rounded lines of the elephant such as straight trees or grass


Elephant rears are unique and large with great tails. A nicely framed rear shot shows the elephants in and interacting with their environment. Walking off “into the sunset” communicates that these elephants are wild and free.

Personality / Cute Babies

Elephants appear to have individual personalities and we often can see some of ourselves in their movement, behavior, and interaction. Anytime we can photograph this connect to ourselves it makes a more impactful image. They show happiness, companionship, nervousness, and aggravation through their actions and interactions. Capture moments of joy when they are in the water or doing something crazy.

You can see the joy when elephants get into the water
This elephant is using a very short scratching post – we had a good laugh at this

Elephant babies are very cute and are well looked after by their mothers and other herd members: it is not hard to capture intimate moments between mothers and babies.

Shape Silhouette

Sometimes lighting on a safari is challenging, but taking bad lighting and turning it into a silhouette shot can give you a special image. Elephant’s unique shape works very well against a sunset.


When you get out on safari and see elephants, get to know them and capture some images that illustrate everything that is fun, interesting, and unique about them.  There are not many subjects so expressive and charismatic.

Other Related Posts

Safari Story: Elephants at the Mudbath

Post Processing: 1 photo 3 ways

Dynamic Black and White Safari Images

Our photo Safaris in 2018


Using the Lightroom Dehaze tool on Safari Images

Last year Adobe released a new version of Lightroom CC which contains their newest adjustment tool: The DeHaze slider.  It is found in the FX menu of the Development module (way down toward the bottom of the list).

You must have  the CC version of Lightroom to use it,  but if you have Photoshop, there is a way to access the tool and take  it further using a few medium/advanced PS techniques. (see at the end of this article for details). Also this tool works on the entire image – in Photoshop you can target the area where the effect takes place.

The purpose of the Dehaze slider is  to either add or remove atmospheric haze from a photo.  In Adobe’s words:“The Dehaze technology is based on a physical model of how light is transmitted, and it tries to estimate light that is lost due to absorption and scattering through the atmosphere.”  The obvious use is for adjusting landscape images, but I have found it useful with safari images where there was quite a bit of dust in the air and even for some underwater images where the water was not clear. (the underwater equivalent of dust)

Using Dehaze with an Underwater Image


For me, it is a tool that combines Contrast, color saturation,  and midtone sharpening into a single tool.  Using a combination of tools it is possible to achieve similar results to the Dehaze slider, but if time is an issue, you can get great improvements with just one adjustment.  Investing a bit more time you can build on the improvements Dehaze adds to your images by combining it with further adjustment tools.

Here is an example of how I used Dehaze for an image that was not a landscape.

the original image with no adjustments
The dry, dusty air makes this image lack contrast.

The drought has made everything very dusty and it really effects this image taken in the mid morning light.

image with dehaze adjustment
The image with just a Dehaze adjustment

With just one adjustment, the colors pop and the contrast is greatly improved.

Now I experiment with doing some Exposure adjustments first before applying the Dehaze.

My method for this is to temporarily Desaturate the image so I can analyze it without the distraction of color.

bw version
The unadjusted image temporarily desaturated so I can adjust exposure

I used the Tone Curve tool (you can also use the 4 sliders under Exposure) to add contrast by darkening the Shadows and Darks and lightening the Lights. I left the Highlights as they were since there is a bit of bright light in the mane and sky. I then restored the color to see the following improvement.

Image with exposure adjustments
Image with exposure adjustments

Now I add the Dehaze adjustment – a little bit less than I used when it was my only adjustment.


Dehaze has taken the image a step better than exposure adjustments alone.

Looking at the results in detail,  I want to bring some lightening back to the Shadows range of the midtones.  I go to my Darks slider in the Tone Curve tool (or the Shadows in the Exposure section) to lighten these tones up. I can now see the details in the lion’s face better.

small adjustments after the dehaze tool
After the exposure and dehaze adjustment, I back off of the Shadows adjustment to bring light back to the lions face.

Now my image is acceptable or I can add details such as small color adjustments (to saturation or hue) or some targeted sharpening or highlighting on places like the eyes.

Here are a few other images with a simple Dehaze adjustment.

leopard image
Image out of the camera
with a dehaze adjustment
The image after a small Dehaze adjustment
elephant image
Image with no adjustments
elephant image adjusted
Image after a Dehaze adjustment

For those without Lightroom CC who have Photoshop or those who take the technique further with more targeted results:

Open the image in Photoshop.

Make a duplicate of the background layer.

Go to the Filter Menu and find Camera Raw Filter

Dehaze appears under the FX tab

Make your adjustments and choose OK to return to Photoshop.

Now you will make a Layer Mask which will hide the effect where you do not want it. – in my example I will mute the effect in the background.

Add the layer mask to the layer which has the Camera Raw Filter adjustments.  Use a paintbrush and black color to mask out the effect.   You can soften your brush and/or lower the opacity at the transition points.

limiting the effect
limiting the Dehaze effect to just the foreground and not the background

If I had turned my copied layer into a Smart Object, I would be able to return to the Camera Raw adjustments and amend them as I  wish.

The Dehaze tool is now my go to tool for images that need contrast boost – especially if it was taken in dusty conditions.

Check out more of my Post Processing Techniques.

Using Shadows Highlights tool to add contrast

The Dehaze Tool for underwater photos

Safari Story: The Life of a Leopard

During our small group photo safaris we travel an hour and half south of our Tree House Lodge to the Sabi Sands Private Game Reserve.  This is a very old reserve (one of the first to be decided as a nature reserve) and we stay in the section which is bordering the Kruger National Park.  There is no fence so wildlife is free to range into both areas.

Leopard in Sabi Sands
Leopard Tingana is paused to watch and listen for prey or other predators

We come to Sabi because they have the rivers and tree conditions that leopard prefer and thrive in.  They also have a long history of tracking and knowing their leopards very intimately so the rangers quickly find the leopards and can tell us each animal’s story.

We had many wonderful leopard moments over the course of our 3 September 2016 safari groups.  This evening game drive was especially nice:  we tracked a male leopard named Tingana while he went on his early evening rounds

leopard in sabi sands
He observes every smell, sound, and movement ever vigilant for the presence of lions.
small group photo safari
patrolling his territory
photographing the big 5 on safari
Our leopard crosses a road on his rounds. We often get very close sighting of big cats who ignore our vehicles
photo safari with leopards
The leopard is checking an area with holes where there might be warthogs
photographing leopards on safari
checking for warthogs in a hole
photographing big cats in Sabi Sands
he pauses in a comfortable spot to take a short nap

We catch back up to our leopard after the sun has set.  There are lions moving through near by.  A leopard can be harassed or killed by lions so he is becomes very alert and circles back to his tree where he had a kill stashed away.

male leopard
A lion is nearby and our leopard is suddenly very alert to the danger
leopard in a tree
Resting after a meal stashed in a tree

After a snack in the safety of a tree he goes back to resting.

The next morning we catch up with Tingana and he is on the ground under the tree still guarding it from lions and others who would steal it.

photo safari with leopards
The male keeps thinking about and checking on the impala carcass up in the tree


On a previous visit to Sabi Sands we saw Tingana with a zebra kill up a  tree.  It is amazing to think of the strength this animal must command in order to drag a small zebra high up a tree.

See our photo safaris which include a visit to Sabi Sands in 2017 & 2018 on our website  Africa Wild Safaris



Favorite Moments from our September 2016 Safaris

Though there is no hiding the stress of the long drought on the animals and plant life of the bushveld, we had excellent wildlife sightings.  The predators thrive during these conditions with so many herbivores loosing condition to lack of food.  There was hope in the first good early rains. We enjoyed the cooler than average temperatures and watched the drama of nature unfold.  These are some of ours guests and my own favorite moments from our recent 3 safari groups.

I use a Canon 5D MKIII  and most of my images are shot using a 70 - 200mm lenses, sometimes with a 1.4 teleconverter. I also use a 300mm lens for the long shots in Kruger - this also with a teleconverter.   I use a monopod as stabilization as this method works in all vehicles, is light, and versatile. 

I have now upgraded to the Canon 5D 4 and look forward to its first trip to Africa in April 2017

Unusual Sightings

Martial Eagle Makes a Large Kill

Martial eagle has made a kill

Martial eagle has made a kill

Most of our large raptor sightings are of the bird of prey scouting from the top of a tree or involved in a crowd of birds on a scavenged carcass.  The eagle was able to take down a steenbok.  The bird plummeted with enough force to knock the weakened antelope to the ground then held it in a choke hold.

A small steenbok can fall victim to a skilled raptor
A small steenbok can fall victim to a skilled raptor

Following a Leopard on His Rounds

In the early evening we tracked a leopard as he surveyed his territory and looked for hunting opportunities…and took a nap

Our trackers knew where to look for this male and we found him early in our game drive.  He is a very robust male who has obviously had success hunting lately.  We had a wonderful time seeing the daily life of this predator.

A male leopard starts out in the late afternoon on a hunt
A male leopard starts out in the late afternoon on a hunt
A leopard stops for a drink
He pauses to get a good drink.

Leopards love warthogs and this one spent some time checking likely dens while listening and watching for some to return for the night.

checking for warthogs in a hole
checking for warthogs in a hole
he pauses in a comfortable spot to take a short nap
he pauses in a comfortable spot to take a short nap

It is possible this leopard has a recent kill stashed up a tree (his stomach does look a bit big) and thus he is only surveying territory tonight and hunting only what is easy to get.

See more of my Safari Reports from 2016
May 2016

September 2017

Seeing Spotted Hyena’s Family Life

Most times we see hyenas at the kills made by lions, or harassing a cheetah.  We had a chance to see a more sympathetic side of hyenas at a den sight with multiple pups.

hyena eating
Hyena scavenge at a giraffe carcass after the lions have abandoned it
hyena with puppy
The dominant hyena takes care of one her pups at the den

The den had several cute puppies and the dominant female (mother) was very attentive and affectionate to them. The usual subadult den assistants were also there keeping the bold puppies close.

Photographing Lions

Seeing and photographing lions is always a thrill. We have seen many different  lion kills and pride groupings this year.  Observing the social dynamics of the group at feeding times is very revealing. The physical demands of eating a carcass is surprising as is the effort put into guarding the meal from vultures and scavengers even after all the lions are so full they can hardly move.  We can get very close and see every detail for different positions.

female lion with cubs
A female lion has brought her cubs to the kill for a meal
photographing lions
We are able to get really close to predators

Learning about Conservation Efforts

We are lucky to have many wildlife conservation and rehabilitation centres near our lodge.

It is always an educational experience for first time guests and repeat visitors like myself.  We visited an orphaned baby rhino, the raptors recovering from poisoning, and other permanent and temporary species.

baby rhino
Our rehab centres take in rhinos orphaned through poaching. They have caretakers with them constantly who attempt to teach them about being a rhino and to make them feel safe.
Vultures who have fallen victim to poison carcasses are rehabilitated at local centre

Great Wildlife Moments at the Lodges

Often we don’t have to leave the lodge to have great wildlife encounters: it is all around us.  The night skies are magnificent in the near total darkness and the sounds are exotic.

One hot afternoon our guests were relaxing in the pool when giraffes came to eat buds off their favorite trees.

tree house lodge
Giraffes continue to feed on budding trees while guests enjoy the pool
wildlife at the lodge
One fine afternoon at the tree house lodge enjoying a drink and a cool dip with the giraffes so close
weaver building nest
A male builds the round hanging nest in a day
weaver bird
The female inspects the completed nest

Our safaris are full of wildlife which will thrill photographers and those without fancy cameras. We also believe that all the wildlife needs to be presented within a context of current conservation  efforts, successes, and challenges.  We celebrate and appreciate each species of bird, insect, plant, and animal for its role in the whole ecosystem of our corner of South Africa.

Our safaris are educational, fun, exciting, surprising, and fulfilling – and some say life-changing.