Category Archives: Underwater Photography Techniques and Post Processing

Techniques to capture great underwater photographs of sharks, whales, dolphins, and manatees. Creative post processing and digital asset management.

Tiger Shark and Hammerhead Dive 2017

Tiger Sharks and Hammerheads Dive Trip in Bahamas

see our trips for 2018  at www.TigerSharkDive.com  and www.GregorySweeney.com

Trip Report 2017

This year was our first year combining Tiger Sharks at Tiger Beach and Hammerheads in Bimini.  Of course we also had the bull sharks, lemons, caribbean reefs sharks.

Hammerhead dive liveaboard in Bahamas
Hammerhead eating some fish
Hammerhead dive in Bimini
Hammerhead in a cloud of fish
Tiger Beach Bahamas
Tiger Shark
Tiger shark diving in Bahamas
Tiger Shark

Tiger Shark

Shark diving
Lemon Sharks attracted to the back of our boat
Bull Shark
Bull Shark
Bull Shark
Bull Shark
MV Dolphin Dream
Our Boat

 

 

Sailfish and Sardine Run Trip Report 2017

Sailfish and Sardines in Isla Mujeres, Mexico

Trip Report 2017

Sailfish along with bonus Whale Sharks, Dolphins, and Giant Manta Rays.

Trip Report

 

Private charter for sailfish and sardine run mexico
Sailfish maintain the baitball close to the surface and wait their turn

This year I lead 2 groups down to Isla Mujeres for the Sardine Run.  Each group was on our charter boat for 5 full days on the water.

This year’s experience demonstrated to all of us how the sardines and sailfish are just two pieces of a larger ecosystem in the Gulf of Mexico.  We encountered Whale Sharks, Giant Mantas, Sailfish , and Dolphins all feeding in food rich waters.  The sardines are there to feed on the plankton  and krill and they attract all the species that want to eat sardines such as the sailfish and dolphins.  We were excited to see so many different species out in the open blue water.

Photograph sailfish in Mexico
A guest photographs among a group of sailfish in a coordinated attack on the baitball

On our first day when we found the dolphins we thought we had found a pod feeding on sardines and perhaps the same bait school that some sailfish were working,  but this was not the case.  In fact the encounter was more unusual:  this was a pod in the act of mating.  The frenzied males were chasing the females and competing with each other to dominate her. They paid no notice to us as we swam along and photographed them.

pod of dolphins
We were able to swim with a pod of dolphins
sailfish Mexico
Sailfish and sardines

Over the next few days we found some sailfish.  The captain and crew must look for frigate birds diving into the water.  This is a sign that sardines or other food is near the surface.  Spotting the surface disturbance of the sailfish or sardines would be impossible so the birds are the best method to find Sailfish.  We are very lucky to work with experienced and patient captains for have loads of experience in these waters.  They found us several chances to “drop” us  in the water  with sailfish.

Captain of Sailfish Charter boat
Our Captain searching for birds, sardines, and sailfish
Sailfish Charter Boat
Our boat has located a flock of frigate birds which means sailfish and sardines below
Frigate birds
Captains look for Frigate Birds which flock around sardines close to the surface
snorkel with sailfish
The water is warm enough for 3mm wetsuits or less

Once in the water it is some fast surface swimming to catch up to the moving baitball.  I have found that it is easier to keep up with a group of sailfish who are managing a smaller baitball. The large schools of sardines  move and break apart to rapidly.

sailfish and baitball
Bait Ball: the sailfish like to keep the ball tight and close to the surface
Swim with sailfish Mexico
Sailfish and baitball

The sailfish work together to trap the sardines near the surface. The birds are diving down to grab fish at the same time as sailfish take turns running into the baitball and swatting at the fish to stun them.  They then eat fish that are stunned and separated from the ball.  Then a another makes a run. The sailfish flash colors and their “sail” fins as a means of communication.  This action makes for great video.

Snorkel with Sailfish
Guests enjoying the search for sailfish

It can be a long day of searching for sailfish so on a less productive day we  tried a different area and were excited to find  feeding whale sharks and giant mantas.  These two species are known to aggregate in these waters in the summer months, so it is unusual to find them in the winter.  We had nice long encounters with the whale sharks.  The giant mantas swam in loops while they fed.  I was able to take many images of their individualized markings.  I submit all my manta photos to the local Manta Trust .  They confirmed that these are mantas that have been documented in the area during summer concluding that there is a resident population – very exciting!

Isla Mujeres Whale Shark
On one of the days we could not find the sailfish, we found whale sharks
Whale Shark
Whale shark feeding on the same food that the sardines enjoy
Giant Manta Ray
We found a group of mantas and whale sharks drawn to the food the sardines also eat. They were willing subjects for a long time.
Snorkel with manta rays
A guest free dives to photograph a manta

All of my guests had some great images and were pleased with the surprise species encounters and with the fact that we were able to find sailfish.  I wish to thank all of them for making this an enjoyable trip for everyone.  I hope to see them on a future trip.

Equipment

I was very conscious of baggage volume and weight when I made  my equipment choices.  My biggest decision was between my 16 – 35mm lens and the fish eye.  I have used both before for sailfish.  While the images with the fisheye were nice, one drawback was how close you need to be to get a good shot. Also if you get too close, your subject gets distorted at the edges of the image.  I did not want to bring both or switch my equipment halfway through, so I opted for the 16 – 35mm.

I have a Nauticam housing with my best glass dome port.  I also had  a 2nd 5DMKIII as a backup and set for land images.  No strobes as they would just slow down my swimming.

I have had my housing from my old Canon 5DII converted to fit my 2nd 5D III or a future RS.  I like things to be interchangeable and to carry less equipment.

My initial setup was thus:

Canon 5D MKIV  with a 16 – 35mm lens  ISO  400  1/320 and f5.6

When  conditions were cloudy or if the action was further below the surface,  I stayed in the ISO 400 – 640 range, Shutter priority.  For the sunny days and surface shots, I would dial things down.

The subjects are alway moving so a center weighted autofocus mode is important as is keeping the shutter fast enough to get crisp images.

 

Private Charter swim with Sailfish
Our boat as we swim back for another drop on the baitball

 

You can enjoy my sailfish images from past seasons in my online gallery

Online Gallery of Sailfish and Other Underwater Images

Dates for my Next Sailfish Trip

Sailfish Hunting Article

Staying on Isla Mujeres

As always, Isla Mujeres is a fun and comfortable home base for this adventure (and our whale shark trip in the summer).  Our hotel is close to the dock and restaurants, while being a quiet place to rest.

Pool at our hotel

Restaurant in Isla Mujeres
One of the colorful restaurants in town

There is a nice pool which leads down to the beach.  The rooms have AC and many have a balcony facing the water.

Sailfish Statue
Isla Mujeres is a destination for beach goers and sport fishermen practicing catch and release
Isla Mujeres Sailfish
One of the many colorful murals around town

Sailfish Group Trip

There are many good restaurants in town and food is very economical (average of $30 total for  dinner) .   We feasted on fresh fish, Mediterranean dishes, local tastes, and Cuban. I have been going so many years now that I have a list of the best places to please all my guests.

Isla Mujeres Mexico Sailfish
The first group out at one of the excellent and economical restaurants in Isla Mujeres

The shops are colorful and the people are friendly and we enjoyed just walking around town.   The guests and I  had happy hour around the pool with great conversations .

I hope to share another adventure with each of them and I am already looking forward to my next visit to Isla Mujeres.

 

 

Sailfish & Sardine Adventure for Feb 2018

A Special Opportunity to Join a Most Exciting Marine Wildlife Encounter

Sailfish Hunting Bait Balls in Isla Mujeres

January 29 – Feb 4 2018

* Preliminary Dates

5 boat days for sailfish

Limited to 5 guests

swim with sailfish and sardine run
A guest snorkels while photographing sailfish

Photograph and free dive with sailfish hunting sardines in the blue water off the tip of the Yucatan Peninsula. Our private charter leaves daily from the docks of Isla Mujeres for an 8 hour day of maximum time in the water photographing and enjoying this incredible encounter.

Only snorkeling gear is required and the action happens at or a meter or two below the surface. We charter the most experienced sport fishing guides who know the water and patterns of the sardines and predators.

Limited to 5 passengers on boat plus guide and crew. This is an excellent opportunity for photographers to capture dramatic images and video.  Freediving and excellent swimming skills are recommended in order to enjoy this athletic experience.

sailfish and sardine run Mexico
A sailfish has snagged a sardine from the bait ball and eats it, Gulf of Mexico

Read my article about Swimming with Sailfish  from Underwater Photographer Magazine Issue#71

 Images and Trip Reports:

Trip Report 2016

Trip Report 2017

Sailfish Image Gallery 

Trip Details on my Website

Comments from our Guests:

The trip was fantastic.  Excellent itinerary and well organized.  I saw way more sailfish than I ever expected and was much closer than I thought possible.  My friends are amazed by the photos I took.  I got a really good shot of you that I attached.  Many thanks to you and Karen.  Michael and I are spreading the word about a trip to Africa.  Great trip and hope to see you again” ——- Kurt Bitters

“Had a great time in the water and topside. And, I salute your restaurant selections! I’ll be back for more… you’re a topnotch guide and host.  I will be back for more.”

— Bob Pooley

 

sailfish-4

The hotel has a private beach with pool and deck. The rooms are ensuite with a balcony, AC, and wifi. Upgraded rooms are available at extra cost. The town of Isla Mujeres is safe and features many great restaurants, shops, beaches, bars, and a park. It is an easy ferry ride from Cancun.

I will need a minimum of 4 guests to make this trip happen and a max of 5 to allow for uncrowded boat and encounters.

 

Please contact me soon with your interest so I finalize bookings and make sure I get space on the fleet’s and hotel’s busy in season schedule. Contact Me

Get more details & images on our website

Contact us to reserve your spot 

Whale Sharks and Mantas 2016

This season was full of whale sharks, some mantas and nice clear water and good weather.

Here is a collect of some of my images from this year

My dates for 2017 are July 8 – 13 & July 13 – 18

 

swim with whale sharks
On of my guests swims with a whale shark and takes video
whale sharks in Isla Mujeres
A whale shark vacuums up plankton at the surface
swim with whale sharks
Whale shark front view
whale shark mouth wide open
Getting in front of a whale shark as they feed
giant manta ray swimming
A manta swims at the surface in a school of fish
manta ray swimming
Giant manta ray swimming
Whale shark charter isla mujeres
Close up of a whale shark feeding at the surface
swim with whale sharks Mexico
a guest swims next to a whale shark with it mouth open
whale shark private charter Mexico
Whale Shark spots

See all of my underwater trips for 2017  

Sailfish Hunting Mexico

Whale Sharks 2015 Trip Report

 

Sailfish Gallery – Sardine Run Isla Mujeres

 

Sailfish and Sardine Run in the Gulf of Mexico off Isla Mujeres, Mexico

 

Sailfish and Sardine Run Isla Mujeres MexicoIn a few days I will be heading to Mexico to photograph the Sailfish.

This is a  challenging photographic situation: the fish are fast, the baitballs in chaos, birds diving at the surface, action all around.  It is well worth it to witness this spectacle.  The images can be exciting and beautiful capturing a dramatic natural spectacle.

Please enjoy this gallery of my sailfish images from the past years.  I look forward to sharing my images from my upcoming trip.

Sailfish and Sardine Run Isla Mujeres Mexico

These images were taken with my Canon 5D MKII and MKIII in an underwater housing .

The lenses I used were a EF15mm F2.8 Fisheye  and an EF 16-35mm f2.8   .  While I found an equal number of good photos taken with both lenses, for this year’s trip I will just take the 16-35mm.  I base this decision on the fact that I have to get very close with the fisheye and given the speed of these animals and the choas, it is difficult and if I miss the sweet spot I get distortion of the fish’s body shape.

 

Interested in Joining Me next year?  Information on my 2017 Sailfish Trip 

 

Sailfish and Sardine Run Isla Mujeres Mexico Sailfish and Sardine Run Isla Mujeres Mexico Sailfish and Sardine Run Isla Mujeres Mexico Sailfish and Sardine Run Isla Mujeres Mexico Sailfish and Sardine Run Isla Mujeres Mexico Sailfish and Sardine Run Isla Mujeres Mexico Sailfish and Sardine Run Isla Mujeres Mexico Sailfish and Sardine Run Isla Mujeres Mexico Sailfish and Sardine Run Isla Mujeres Mexico Sailfish and Sardine Run Isla Mujeres Mexico Sailfish and Sardine Run Isla Mujeres Mexico Sailfish and Sardine Run Isla Mujeres Mexico Sailfish and Sardine Run Isla Mujeres Mexico Sailfish and Sardine Run Isla Mujeres Mexico Sailfish and Sardine Run Isla Mujeres Mexico

 

Other blog posts you may like:

Using the Lightroom Dehaze filter to correct underwater images

Underwater Photography Image Gallery

Sailfish and Sardines Trip information

My Snorkel and Scuba Trips

Photo Safari in South Africa Dates

2015 My year in Images – Black and White Theme

Each year I pull together a collection of images that summarize all of the wildlife photography and wildlife encounters I had this past year.  This year I thought I would  try a theme of Black and White / Monochrome.

hammerhead Black and White in Lightroom

There are many tools that will help you process your digital images into monochromatic images; Photoshop, Lightroom, and numerous third party and plugin softwares.  Even within Photoshop and Lightroom there are dozens of ways to achieve the black and white look and spirit.

 

For this collection of images I challenged myself to use many of the different techniques available to me in the Photoshop and Lightroom toolset.

The first challenge was which images to choose: not every image is powerful in monochrome / Black & White.  Contrast, range of tonality (black to highlights), sharpness , and separation of subject and background / features are all important for making a successful monochrome image.  Color can be necessary to understand the subject and the setting, but sometimes it is just a distraction. It is these times when the image can be elevated by removing the color (or most of it)

Here are the highlights of my year and a bit about how I processed the images.

January: Hammerhead Sharks in Bimini

hammerhead Black and White in Lightroom
Processed in Lightroom: In the color tools I desaturated on most of the individual color channels but to a less extent on the Aqua and BLue channels to leave a tint. I use the overall Saturation slider to remove more color . Increase contrast with the exposure sliders or curves. The fish eye lens has made it very dark on the edges so I compensate for this with a crop and a Post Crop Vignette to lighten the edges and take some of the circle effect away. Finally I use Clarity and Sharpen

 

February:  Manatees (for my new book  http://www.ManateesGentleGiants.com)

March:  Tiger Sharks and Caribbean Reef Shark,  Bahamas

Duotone Tiger Shark processed in Lightroom
Processed with Lightroom: Here I used one of Lightroom’s Black and White Tone presets – “Creamtone”. I then went under the Split Toning adjustments and changed the colors to cool tones in silver and blue. I increased Contrast and Clarity to sharpen the subject

Quadtone Mode in Photoshop

Processed in Photoshop: I want to use Quadtone: 4 colors assigned according to tonal range Black, shadows, whites, highlights. First change to 8 bit and Greyscale mode. Then choose Duotone Mode. I set 4 colors all in grays and browns and set the curves of each to assign them to a tonal range. I then used a Highpass filter to sharpen. Convert back to RGB before saving.

Shark image in Photoshop
Processed in Photoshop: I used the Black & White adjustment layer first. Then I added a Color Balance adjustment layer to boost the blues and add a cool tint. I used Levels adjustment for sharpening and contrast

April – May:  South Africa

Black and White Vulture processed with Lightroom
I isolated the subject through cropping and further brought it out with darkened background achieved through an adjustment brush. I did a simple desaturation with the Desaturation slider and reducing the Vibrance. Both were reduced to around 15% leaving traces of yellow and red for a tinted effect
Waterbuck in Photoshop
Processed in Photoshop: I used the Mode command to convert to Greyscale. Then used HDR Toning adjustment to starting with the Contrast preset then tweeking it to my liking. I then used dodge and burn layers to bring out the eyes and other details in the face. The HDR tone adjustment provided plenty of contrast and perceived sharpening.

June: Wild Dolphins in the Bahamas

Dolphin Split Tone Lightroom
Processed in Lightroom: This utilizes Split Toning to do the same effect as Duotones in PS. I first optimized contrast and exposure, desaturated the image, then set tones for the lights and darks and balanced between the two as well as controlled the saturation of each.

 

July: Whale Sharks in Mexico

Whale Shark Black and white in Photoshop
Processed in Photoshop: I used the Channel Mixer to remove the color and adjust the tonality. Here I used the BW + Red filter preset to make the water dark. I used a multi layer technique to add lots of sharpening: I copy the image several times, invert one of the layers then do a surface blur on it. Two different blend modes and a mask to limit the sharpening just to the subject. I also added a Curves layer for added contrast. and some targeted dodge and burn on places like the eyes.

Sept – Oct:  South Africa

Monochrome rhino in Lightroom
Processed in Lightroom: This was misty and low contrast. I wanted to preserve this feeling. I achieved the tint through a White Balance adjustment and dropped the Saturation and Vibrance sliders to subdue the already subtle colors. I used a local adjustment brush on the rhino to add contrast, sharpening, and clarity to the subject. Finally I added a Post Crop Vignette to dark the edges and center attention on the rhino.

I hope this has sparked your creativity and you will start to experiment and explore ways to enhance your photos in the monochromatic realm.  

 

Some other posts about Post Processing and Black & White

But first get some Great new Images on a Photo Tour in 2016 – 2017

Creative Black and White Techniques

Boosting Color with Split Toning

Correcting a Leopard Image in Lightroom

Whale Sharks in Mexico 2015 Trip Report

Private charter for whale sharks
Our boat captains are good at dropping us ahead of the moving whale sharks so as to get the front on shots

The 2015 whale shark season is not yet over, but I have returned from 2 great weeks with my guests and their whale shark experience.  We had great weather (one of the reasons I choose July) and whale shark encounters each day including several days with manta rays.

Isla-Mujeres-Mexico-3

 

whale shark private charters for photographers
I free dive deep to get the entire whale shark framed into the shot
A large whale shark
A large whale shark

Our first few days the whale sharks were feeding just under the water.  Over the next few days they were again feeding on the surface and easy to spot from in the water.  This also facilitated some great topside images.  The water color and clarity was variable as we tried different areas hoping to find mantas and whale sharks feeding on the surface. On occasion it was more blue-green and on other days we had crystal clear blue water.

A remora temporarily detached from its host
A remora temporarily detached from its host
snorkel with whale sharks in mexico
A whale shark feeding just below the surface

Being in the water with whale sharks teaches you much about their life and role in the environment.  One afternoon we witnessed schools of tevelli fish swimming close to the whale sharks; by their fins and mouths and even cowering underneath.  The reason because clear when I heard dolphin squeaks underwater.  A pod of 4 small but fast Atlantic spotted dolphin charged up to me, did 2 complete circles around me then raced on to confront the whale sharks.  I saw a few fish meet their demise.

Small fish take shelter from predators around and under the whale sharks
Small fish take shelter from predators around and under the whale sharks
Dolphins hunt for fish hiding among the feeding whale sharks
Dolphins hunt for fish hiding among the feeding whale sharks
swim with giant manta rays
A giant manta swims by feeding

The giant mantas are my favorite to photograph.  We would see the tell tale signs in the form of wingtips above the surface.  When we dove in they were coming from all directions feeding at about 1.5m below the surface.  Some had formed a convoy of 4 to 5 individuals all slowly flapping and scooping in food.  A few times I was present to photograph their looping up and down feeding.

giant manta rays
Mantas were swimming in groups and in line making large circles feeding

Each manta has a unique pattern on the underbelly.  I donate all images I can get of these identification markers to the Manta Trust so they might add to their Caribbean database.  It would be wonderful if some images from this season match individuals from last season.

Read my post about the Manta Trust Conservation and Caribbean Project 

whale shark gills
Close up of whale shark gills
Whale shark charters
Whale shark feeds at the surface around our boat
Whale shark charters for photographers
Keeping pace with a whale shark feeding is challenging but possible

Each day we left the dock in the morning and then returned in the mid afternoon around 3 or 4pm.  While on boat we had comfortable space, shade, sandwiches and snacks.  We could enjoy ourselves while the captain and crew placed us in the best areas for whale sharks and mantas.  All boat cooperate to take care of the wildlife by limiting numbers of boats and people in the water around each group of whale sharks.  At the conclusion of our swimming each day we enjoyed freshly ceviche specially prepared by the first mate before embarking back to Isla Mujeres.

Isla-Mujeres-Mexico-4 Isla-Mujeres-Mexico-5 Isla-Mujeres-Mexico-6

 

When not on the boat we had comfortable hotel rooms with plenty of public spaces for relaxing and connecting with wifi. Restaurants are plentiful and very good and most are very affordable.  We had many very excellent meals and the shopping was fun and diverse.

At the opposite end of the island is a part to explore and take in the rough coastline.

Isla-Mujeres-Mexico-1 Isla-Mujeres-Mexico-2

I will be hosting Whale Shark Trips again next year.  I have again secured great boats and crew and rooms at the Playa Media Luna.  Our boats are limited to 6 guests  so space is limited

Contact us   or Get More Information on my website

Whale Shark and Manta Trip Log 2014  

 

Using Lightroom with Underwater Images: Exploring the new Dehaze Tool

Introduction

The newest release of Adobe Lightroom CC 2015  has a new tool called Dehaze which is stated to “dramatically improve images by removing haze”.  I have been wondering if this tool is applicable to underwater situations that mimic haze (scatter and low vis).

In this demonstration I take a pretty good underwater image that feels a little “hazy” or “Milky” and apply the Dehaze tool like a secret weapon to see if it improves the sharpness of the image.  I also compare it and combine it with the Clarity tool – another finishing touch secret weapon.

The Original Image

(click on photos to enlarge)

starting image of a whale shark
The image before I begin

The Image with some Exposure, Curve, and Color adjustments

 

Exposure corrected image
The image after apply some exposure, curve, and color correction

 

Adding the Clarity Adjustment

image with Clarity added
The image with a Clarity adjustment

As per my usual method, I add the Clarity adjustment to the image right at the end of my process.  The Clarity slider adds mid tone contrast, lending a sharpness to the image.   I don’t normally Sharpen beyond the default setting unless I am presenting elsewhere besides on screen.  If it is to be viewed very large or printed I get serious and sharpen in Photoshop.

Clarity settings
The Clarity setting – also shows my exposure adjustments done previous

I used a fair amount of Clarity to pop out details on the whale sharks face.  It is a good effect and I am happy with the results.

Also you can see my Exposure settings from the beginning of my processing which back off the bright highlights (the white upper lip near the surface) and boosts some contrast in the mid tones on the body by separating Shadows and Whites, and adding darkest tones by decreasing the blacks.  Not seen here are further adjustments to the Curves to manage the Highlights,  but that is a different topic.

Using the Curves Tool in Lightroom

Color Correcting beyond the White Balance

Trying a Dehaze Adjustment

dehaze setting

With a just a Dehaze adjustment – clarity set back to zero

Adobe Dehaze adjustment
The Dehaze setting

Dehaze was a bolder effect, but similar to a Clarity, but I see a slight “enriching” of the colors as if the smarts behind this tool also effect a certain color range.  I like the effect, but might have to follow it with a small color shift and a brightening of the water to maintain the contrast between water and shark.

A Similar Tool that does the Opposite – Luminance Noise

noise in the water
Detail of the water showing noise

Getting rid of Luminance noise is effectively doing the opposite of what the Clarity and Haze are trying to do: add contrast vs remove contrast.

Luminance Noise is common in images taken in the dark. Underwater photos have scatter which in many cases can be treated like Luminance noise.  There is also Color Noise,  which can also happen in (commonly green) water, it is harder to fix.  I applied a pretty heavy Luminance correction to “smooth” the water and remove what manifested as grain in the water.

apply Luminance noise adjustment
Water detail with Luminance Noise adjusted
Luminance noise adjustment
Luminance Noise adjustment settings

The Luminance Slider is the amount of effect to apply

Detail is like telling what size of speck you want the tool to act on

Contrast is telling the tool how different the luminance of the speck has to be in order for the tool to act on it.

These tools take some trial and error to get it smoothed to your taste without going overboard and making it look smeared.

It will not work on all photos unfortunately and in extreme cases you will have to resort to blurring, masking, and advanced tools in PhotoShop.

You can also try the Adjustment brush to a specific area with the Clarity set to a negative value – anti clarity which can work like a gauze effect.  I may explore this in another post one day.

full image noise
The full image with just the Luminance Noise adjustment – Clarity and dehaze off

 

End Results – Luminance Noise Adjusted Water plus Clarity only

full image with clarity and noise adjusted
The full image with noise adjustment and Clarity

 

End Results – Luminance Noise Adjusted Water plus Clarity & Dehaze

noise, dehaze and clarity
Image with Luminance noise adjusted, with Clarity and Dehaze added

End Results – Luminance Noise Adjusted Water plus Clarity & Dehaze and a brightening of the water

Final Result
The final result – I added a small increase in Luminance in the Blue channel to brighten the water

To put back some brilliance in the water that the Dehaze took away,  I brightened the water only in the Blue color channel.  Any adjustment including just midtone adjustment would have effected the results of Clarity and Dehaze on the  black, white, and grey colored whale shark which is where I wanted it.  I dont need the technique on the water and it is uniquely blue compared to the whale shark, so using the Blue Luminance on the color channels allows brightening just in the water.

My conclusion is that i will use the Dehaze tool  and further explore situations where I can use it.

 

Manta Trust Launches Mexican Caribbean Project

The Manta Trust works to conserve manta rays through research, awareness and education.

They work all over the world to study and identify manta ray populations

Anyone who has photographed a manta anywhere in the world  can contribute directly to their global research and conservation by submitting images and sighting encounters though a portal on their website:  Contribute your Manta Images

They need images that best show the spots on the underside of the manta ray – this is how they identify individuals.  With a growing database of individuals it is becoming possible to give you feedback about your sighting and a history of the individual.

The Manta Trust recently contacted me about a video compilation I posted featuring whale sharks and manta rays filmed off Isla Mujeres,  Mexico.  This lead to me submitting several dozen images  of mantas from my collect to add to their research and database.

manta id card close up of giant manta ray

Karen Fuentes, Project Leader for Mexico, was so pleased with my images that she awarded me a Manta Certificate.  I get to name one of the mantas I encountered in Mexico.

 

My manta is a Male and I chose the name Atarau – the New Zealand Maori word for Moonlight

mantas swimming

manta Trust database file
Atarau the manta is now in the Manta Trust Database

Here is information about their project in Mexico:

http://www.mantatrust.org/in-the-field/mexico-caribbean/

I will be encouraging  my guests on the whale shark trip to take manta id photos if we are so lucky as to find them again this year!

I will be posting my results from Mexico starting July 13th  so please follow my social media

photographing manta rays GS_4796_130727-Edit

More of my manta and whale shark images  Image Gallery

manta ray dance

Related Posts

Magical Mantas and Whale Sharks

Swim with Whales Sharks and Giant Manta Rays in Mexico 2015

Using Lightroom Metadata to Research Best Settings

I use Lightroom 3 primarily for organization and secondly for quick to medium difficulty adjustments.  My advanced work and preparation for print are still done in PS.  Many times LR  is all I need to select photos, prep them for use on the web, and export them.

With all of these features and with more integration tools, added image adjustment capabilities, and printing options going into the program, it is easy to forget that LR is a database. Like all databases, it is only as good as the data is complete and detailed, but if you manage the detail you can create a powerful learning and efficiency tool.

I am a wildlife photographer and a habitual photographer who photographs in the same location over and over and with the same subjects.  The conditions and sometimes fast action do not leave much time to fuss with settings and adjust.  I do get some chances to experiment, but I want to be in the ball park when I enter the water or get in the game vehicle.  This is where a little extra time in LR  provides me with a valuable learning tool.  I consult it before each trip and keep charts for each camera and lens as a quick cheat sheet based on real data.

Settings, time of image, flash use, and equipment are all recorded in the metadata automatically (make sure you adjust the time on your camera for time zones and daylight savings!) but I also enforce the discipline of  recording the location in detail  (for example: north corner or in canal), the sky and lighting conditions, and for underwater – the visibility.  Next I will try to add tides to that.  I also rate each photo before I do much adjusting to it and I keep all but the really embarrassing shots – at least until my disk gets full.

I have learned some surprising things such as all of my best manatee photographs happened between 9am and 9:30am.  There was a significant drop off in number of quality shots before and after this time and the golden time ranges later as it gets later in the season. This makes sense due to the lengthening of days and the sunrise getting later.  Knowing this, I no longer have to get up before dawn!

Using the Library Filter panel in LR I can use it like a query tool to see a count of images with the keywords I have chosen and combinations of the ISO, flash, rating, etc that I choose.  The tool is not a perfectly flexible query tool but you can be clever with your keywords and how you record data to get it to track and measure what you are interested in.  Maybe improvements to this will make it into a future release.

When I have my manatee workshop next week I will be able to look at the time, weather, and water conditions and recommend settings.  I prepared the following chart using meta data in LR.

7am to 9 am
Cloudy and/or  low visibility ISO 640 F2.8 1/80 – 1/100
Bright and clear visibility ISO 320 F3.2 – f5.0 1/60 – 1/80
9 am – 10 am
Cloudy and/or  low visibility ISO 640 F6.3 1/100
Bright and clear visibility ISO 400 F4.0 – 6.3 1/80 – 1/125
10 am – 11:30 Cloudy and/or  low visibility ISO 500 – 320 F6.3 – 8.0 1/80
Bright and clear visibility ISO 160ISO 250 F7.1 – f8.0F6.3 1/601/250

For use on my safaris, I am using the  data to come up with animal specific settings given lighting conditions.  Of course you can use the histogram on the camera screen and your experience to do the same thing, but many times I cant take the time to analyze and adjust in the field (while cageless with sharks or at a lion hunt) Thus is the nature of wildlife and sports photography.

If you needed another reason to keep you photos organized and properly loaded, taking this “big picture” look at a collection of images of your favorite subject  is very rewarding.