Tag Archives: Basking sharks

What is a Basking Shark?

Basking Sharks (Cetorhinus maximus)

Basking Shark
Basking Shark

 

Basking Sharks are the 2nd biggest fish in the ocean. (whale sharks are the biggest)

A basking shark can grow to over 10m (33 ft) long and weight several tons. Their mouth can open 1 metre wide for feeding on plankton. They filter fed on the plankton by sieving out the minuscule animals from the water column using special gill rakers. These rakers are specially adapted bone which sit in the sharks gills and act in a similar fashion as baleen in fliter-feeding whales. They are efficient and can filter up to 1.5 million litres of water her hour.

shaaark cartoon
Shaark cartoon by Phil Watson Shaaark.com

See more shark cartoons  

Scotland has some of the richest cold waters in the world and every spring the oceanic and weather cycles create optimal conditions for explosive blooms of plankton. The sharks migrate from their winter feeding grounds to feast on the plankton and for mating.

 

We will be looking for basking sharks and snorkeling with them this July 2016.  Join our Basking Shark Snorkel

 

Historically basking sharks have been a staple of fisheries because of their size, (former) abundance, and slow movement. Today basking sharks are still hunted all over the world for their livers containing a vast amount of oil. The oil is used in cosmetics, perfume and lubricants. Synthetics and conservation efforts have stopped the hunting in some places and they are now protected. They are also victims of the shark fin trade.

historic image of Shark cartoon

 

Basking Sharks are a cosmopolitan migratory species, found in all of the world’s temperate oceans. In additon they prefer to swim close the shore and also enjoy swimming near the water’s surface swimming at a slow pace while they filter. They travel through the Mediterranean Sea, Pacific and Atlantic ocean, sea of Japan, New Zealand, and Southern Australia. Nova Scotia and New Brunswick are great places to spot them as well. At times they travel in groups of about 100 but also are most often seen traveling alone.

Range of Basking Sharks around the world
Range of Basking Sharks around the world

Basking sharkLike many sharks, ovoviviparous basking sharks develop embryos which first rely on a yolk sac with no placental connection and develop inside the female. Gestation is unknown but might be a year or more. The small young are born fully developed at 1.5 – 2m. From the only pregnant mother ever caught we learned that the brood can be six pups. The lifespan is not known. Experts estimate about 50 years.

 

More about Basking Shark Conservation Efforts

SharkTrust.org