Tag Archives: post processing safari images

Using the Lightroom Dehaze tool on Safari Images

Last year Adobe released a new version of Lightroom CC which contains their newest adjustment tool: The DeHaze slider.  It is found in the FX menu of the Development module (way down toward the bottom of the list).

You must have  the CC version of Lightroom to use it,  but if you have Photoshop, there is a way to access the tool and take  it further using a few medium/advanced PS techniques. (see at the end of this article for details). Also this tool works on the entire image – in Photoshop you can target the area where the effect takes place.

The purpose of the Dehaze slider is  to either add or remove atmospheric haze from a photo.  In Adobe’s words:“The Dehaze technology is based on a physical model of how light is transmitted, and it tries to estimate light that is lost due to absorption and scattering through the atmosphere.”  The obvious use is for adjusting landscape images, but I have found it useful with safari images where there was quite a bit of dust in the air and even for some underwater images where the water was not clear. (the underwater equivalent of dust)

Using Dehaze with an Underwater Image

image-1-final

For me, it is a tool that combines Contrast, color saturation,  and midtone sharpening into a single tool.  Using a combination of tools it is possible to achieve similar results to the Dehaze slider, but if time is an issue, you can get great improvements with just one adjustment.  Investing a bit more time you can build on the improvements Dehaze adds to your images by combining it with further adjustment tools.

Here is an example of how I used Dehaze for an image that was not a landscape.

the original image with no adjustments
The dry, dusty air makes this image lack contrast.

The drought has made everything very dusty and it really effects this image taken in the mid morning light.

image with dehaze adjustment
The image with just a Dehaze adjustment

With just one adjustment, the colors pop and the contrast is greatly improved.

Now I experiment with doing some Exposure adjustments first before applying the Dehaze.

My method for this is to temporarily Desaturate the image so I can analyze it without the distraction of color.

bw version
The unadjusted image temporarily desaturated so I can adjust exposure

I used the Tone Curve tool (you can also use the 4 sliders under Exposure) to add contrast by darkening the Shadows and Darks and lightening the Lights. I left the Highlights as they were since there is a bit of bright light in the mane and sky. I then restored the color to see the following improvement.

Image with exposure adjustments
Image with exposure adjustments

Now I add the Dehaze adjustment – a little bit less than I used when it was my only adjustment.

image-1-exposure-and-dehaze

Dehaze has taken the image a step better than exposure adjustments alone.

Looking at the results in detail,  I want to bring some lightening back to the Shadows range of the midtones.  I go to my Darks slider in the Tone Curve tool (or the Shadows in the Exposure section) to lighten these tones up. I can now see the details in the lion’s face better.

small adjustments after the dehaze tool
After the exposure and dehaze adjustment, I back off of the Shadows adjustment to bring light back to the lions face.

Now my image is acceptable or I can add details such as small color adjustments (to saturation or hue) or some targeted sharpening or highlighting on places like the eyes.

Here are a few other images with a simple Dehaze adjustment.

leopard image
Image out of the camera
with a dehaze adjustment
The image after a small Dehaze adjustment
elephant image
Image with no adjustments
elephant image adjusted
Image after a Dehaze adjustment

For those without Lightroom CC who have Photoshop or those who take the technique further with more targeted results:

Open the image in Photoshop.

Make a duplicate of the background layer.

Go to the Filter Menu and find Camera Raw Filter

Dehaze appears under the FX tab

Make your adjustments and choose OK to return to Photoshop.

Now you will make a Layer Mask which will hide the effect where you do not want it. – in my example I will mute the effect in the background.

Add the layer mask to the layer which has the Camera Raw Filter adjustments.  Use a paintbrush and black color to mask out the effect.   You can soften your brush and/or lower the opacity at the transition points.

limiting the effect
limiting the Dehaze effect to just the foreground and not the background

If I had turned my copied layer into a Smart Object, I would be able to return to the Camera Raw adjustments and amend them as I  wish.

The Dehaze tool is now my go to tool for images that need contrast boost – especially if it was taken in dusty conditions.

Check out more of my Post Processing Techniques.

Using Shadows Highlights tool to add contrast

The Dehaze Tool for underwater photos

Make a Dynamic Wildlife Portrait with Adobe Photoshop

before and after the effect
The image before and after applying the adjustments

A South Africa photo safari will be full of opportunities to photograph animals at close distances. These images have all the details and interesting poses found in modern (human) portraits. You can apply current portrait processing techniques to your wildlife portraits. This technique gives the image added depth and dimension and adds the illusion of the face coming forward.

The key characteristics  of this technique are Light, Contrast,  & Sharpness

waterbuck portrait Cheetah Portrait

Areas with contrast and sharpness draw the viewers attention and lighter areas seem closer to the viewer building intimacy and connection between subject and viewer.

Begin in Camera Raw or Lightroom

Start with a basic White Balance adjustment if the image is too warm or cool.

Also quickly adjust the tone for good exposure and add some contrast. We will add more contrast later and do further work on the overall Tone.

You can also add punch to the eyes now, but I like to leave this as the final touch.

add dodge and burn layer
Add a layer then fill with 50% grey and set to Soft Light. Use the Dodge and Burn Tools on this layer

Dodge and Burn

Dodge and burn will increase contrast and bring out specific details that you think are important. Details around the eyes and character features on the face are good targets.  For animals with facial markings, it is good to bring these out.

This step is done in Photoshop since it will be achieved using a layer mask. Switch To Photoshop from Lightroom by accessing the left click menu and selecting Edit In – Photoshop.

Create a new Layer with blend mode of Soft Light

Fill with 50% gray

Choose Dodge tool

The Dodge/Burn tool has controls which limit the effect to specific tonal ranges: Highlights, Midtones, and Shadows

Start with the Dodge Tool: Set range to Highlights with Exposure between 5 – 10% Paint over areas on the face to brighten highlight areas and other areas you with to appear closer to the viewer. Repeatedly go over areas to make the effect stronger or raise the Exposure setting higher.

Switch to the burn tool and darken midtone and shadow areas in the same way.

dodge and burn layer
Painting with the Dodge and Burn tools creates the following mask which can be edited

It is a bit of a pain, but try to burn and dodge in the whiskers and eyelashes: they are unique to the animal and thus important to present to the viewer.

Contrast and Sharpening

If you are familiar with using Smart Objects, you can duplicate your image layer and convert it to a Smart Object. Then choose Filter – Camera Raw Filter.

Camera Raw Menu
add a Camera Raw Filter to the Smart Object

The alternate method is to run the Camera Raw Filter on the layer. The difference is that with the Smart Object, you can go back and fine tune your Sharpen and Clarity values.

Camera Raw adjustment layer
Use the Adjustment Brush to increase midtone contrast with Clarity and sharpness sliders

In the Camera Raw tool, choose the Adjustment Brush, then set Clarity to around 25 and all other sliders to zero. Check the Mask at the bottom of the dialogue box and paint over the face where you want the effect. Click it off to see the effect, then also increase the Sharpness around +10 – +25. Press Ok to return to PhotoShop.

Desaturate

Press D to set Foreground and Background to default colors of black and white.

Create new Adjustment layer and choose Gradient Map Adjustment Layer .  In the properties panel click on the gradient ramp to open the gradient editor

gradient map menu
Map a Gradient Map Adjustment Layer
Creating Gradient Map
Adjust the gradient to increase the contrast in Highlights and midtones

Drag white color stop left toward the center to intensify the highlights.

desaturate using a Gradient Map
Reduce the Opacity of the Gradient Map layer to temper the desaturation effect

Drag midpoint slider to the left or right a small amount. ( you might want to try midtones both to the left and right on separate layers to see which you like best.) Click OK . Reduce layer opacity to 30% or a percent that gives the look you want. You still want a hint of color instead of a completely monochrome image. The amount that looks good to you will vary depending on the image.

Add some Fake Depth of Field

If the image could use more depth of field, this step will add some.

Add another merged layer to the top of the stack

Use the Filter Blur Gallery Iris Blur and place the oval over the face

Adjust it to fit and so none of the sharp areas are covered

Increase the blur amount. Since animals do not have oval shaped faces (ears etc. ) you can add a mask to the layer and paint black to remove blur from these areas.

Sharpening

Make a merged copy and name it Sharpen. You can make this layer a Smart Object f you wish. Choose Filter Other Highpass. Add radius of 1 – 5 pixel: enough to be able to see the hairs and whiskers, but without a large halo around edges. Change the Blend Mode of the Sharpness layer to Overlay. If the effect is overdone you can reduce the layer opacity or adjust the radius.

High Pass Layer
A Highpass Filter is a monochrome mask which emphasizes edges creating a sharpening effect

At this point you can also add a layer with texture to add a gritty effect. Use a mask to block the texture effect from the eyes so they stay sharp.

Adjusting the Light

The idea here is to darken the background and leave the face bright.

Curves layer
Create a Curves Adjustment Layer and darken the background. Use a mask to keep the subject light

There are several ways to achieve this. One way is to add a curves adjustment layer then mask out the areas you want to remain bright.

Another method is to add another Merged layer to the top   called lighting

Do a Camera Raw filter and choose the Radial Filter tool to  draw oval to encircle the main part of the face. Adjust Exposure to darken outside the oval. Alternately use the Adjustment brush to navigate the non oval face.

Add punch to the eyes

dodge and burn eyes
Go back to the Dodge and Burn layer and add pop to the eyes

If you have used all Smart Objects and Adjustment Layers, you can go back to the Dodge and Burn layer and add some contrast to the eyes. If you have used stamped layers, you simply add a layer at the top, fill with 50% grey and set the Blend Mode to Soft Light. Use the Dodge and Burn tool.

A vignette or cropping might also be a good edition.

Finished portrait
The image after applying the adjustments

Use this series of adjustments on several images to give a consistent look to a collection.

impala portrait Lion portrait