Tag Archives: whale sharks Mexico

Whale Sharks 2018 Trip Report

Whale Sharks Season 2018

Giant Mants

This year was characterized by the number and quality of giant manta ray sightings we enjoyed.  Our guests were very happy to be able to get in the water with groups of them on several occasions.  Our boat captains have become quite good at finding mantas while on our way to the whale shark aggregation.

Whale Sharks Isla Mujeres

We enjoyed great weather on most of the days.  One of the days we returned at the end of the day in a storm, but we have always been lucky to avoid any tropical storms by visiting in July.  The whale sharks were at peak numbers and very concentrated around food sources which lay on the surface.

Whale Sharks Isla Mujeres Drone shot Whale Sharks

The guests had many chances to get in the water each day with the whale sharks enjoying clear water and calm seas.  The whale sharks were feeding on the surface making it easy to snorkel and to make great images.

Whale Sharks Isla Mujeres Whale Sharks Isla Mujeres

It is special to see a whale shark feed in a vertical position: the locals call it “bottle feeding” .  This can last for quite a while with the whale shark pumping its mouth open and closed close to the surface in order to draw in large volumes of water.  A majestic spectacle!

Whale Sharks Isla Mujeres Whale Sharks Isla Mujeres

In more than 8 years of visits this one stands out as one of the best.  I had the company of some great people, Mind blowing wildlife encounters, some good food and drink, and great photography.

Giant Manta Giant Manta

I will return again in 2019 with a new group of people to share this must do, awesome experience with.

Whale Sharks Isla Mujeres

Get Details about my 2019 Trip

I will also be pairing this trip with American Crocodiles in Chinchorro, Mexico (a few hours S. of Cancun)

Crocodiles 2019 Trip Details

 

 

 

 

 

A Guide to Photographing Whale Sharks in Mexico

A Whale Shark & Manta Photography Guide

 

swim with whale sharks in Mexico

Photography & Video tips, Equipment, Techniques, and Best Settings

Useful for photographers with DSLR, Mirrorless, Compact, and GoPro Cameras

Whale Sharks are the biggest fish in the sea and likely the largest living thing you have ever shared the water with.  Even knowing how big they are and seeing them from the surface before getting in does not prepare you for the underwater experience: what is on the surface is only the tip (or fin) of the iceberg.  Their casual effort at swimming and their tenacious feeding effort is an awesome experience and you will want to capture all of this plus your emotional response to their size in your photos.  This guide will give you some pre-travel advise on how to prepare.

This guide is written based on my experiences with whale sharks in the Cancun region of Mexico at Isla Mujeres.

Join one of my Snorkel with Whale Sharks Trips

Divers, free divers, and snorkelers can also swim with whale sharks all over the world including Sea of Cortez Mexico, Ecuador’s Galapagos Islands, Honduras’ Utila, Cebu in the Philippines’, and Indonesia’s Cenderawasih Bay.

I have had many seasons of swimming with whale sharks to experiment and perfect techniques.  I have changed techniques over the years as my cameras have evolved and my creative goals changed from year to year.  With the addition of video to my DSLR camera and the rise of GoPros, I have allocated more in water time to  video.

Photography Equipment for Photographing Whale Sharks

Safety equipment

A wetsuit is required by the regulations. It also keeps the sun off  and protects somewhat from marine creatures.

Consider a hood or lifeguard beanie for sun protection – a colored beanies is also a great safety device which will help the crew keep you in view if you get further afield.

Sunscreen, sunglasses, and coverups for on the boat.

Don’t forget a protective bag and sun coverup for your camera

Purchase a Cinebags Here 

Use a Fisheye Lens

Whale sharks are huge and it is possible to get close to the subject. Using a fisheye lens will let you get the whole fish in the image and capture some detail

DSLR 

Select the widest lens you have – ideally a fisheye prime or fisheye zoom lens: both will give you up to a 180-degree field of view with a reduced minimum focus distance.  When you get as close the shark as you can (without violating any regulations) you will get the whole thing in.  Compared to photographing other moving subjects like dolphins and sailfish, the drag caused by your large dome port will not be a huge factor. Whale sharks are moving, but more at a walking pace than a running pace.

Fisheye lenses like  a 10 – 17mm will be the most popular, especially on crop sensor cameras. Full frame shooters can use the lenses such as  the Sigma 15mm or the Canon 8-15 circular fisheye.

Mirrorless

Underwater photographers using Olympus E-PL and OM-D cameras will opt for the popular 8mm fisheye lenses.

Private charter for whale sharks
Our boat captains are good at dropping us ahead of the moving whale sharks so as to get the front on shots
Compact Camera

Compact camera users will need to use a fisheye wet lens on top of their camera’s built-in lens.

The wet lens increases the field of view (up to 165 degrees).  Without a wide lens, compact users will not be able to get the whole shark in the photo or be too far away: the wide angle lens reduces the minimum focal distance so the photographer can get much closer and still fit the subject into the frame.

Wet lenses require the user to check for and release bubbles around the wet lens each time you get in the water.

A compact camera or phone camera is a great addition for shooting fun shots, cultural features around town,  and people. You can then leave your DSLR in the housing without worry about resetting o-rings and seals.

GoPro

GoPro shooters should be able to record great underwater photo and video of whale sharks without any additional lenses. The shallow depth and natural light mean that you will not need to add a red filter. You might want a polarizer for on the surface though. Using a handle or mount to hold the GoPro can help steady the shot, but beware of rules governing the use of “selfie sticks” – it is prohibited to use a stick to go closer to the animal than the rules allow and rules may have changed to prohibit them altogether.

Strobes

When snorkeling or freediving with whale sharks, strobes are often unnecessary given the amount of available light at the surface. It’s also against local regulations to use strobes in these situations for fear of startling or harming the animal. Make sure to ask your dive guide about the local rules.

The bulk of the strobes can hinder your swimming and the movement may make it difficult to keep them aimed properly with little time to fix them once you are face to face with the large subject that is coming straight at you.

You may wish to have a strobe for topside shots

whale shark mural
One of the colorful murals in Isla Mujeres honoring the whale sharks
Settings
Exposure

DSLR, Mirrorless and Compact shooters have a number of shooting mode options to choose from.

My method is to start with some manual settings and change them as the daylight changes.  Most of my images are at ISO400  with some ranging from ISO320 to ISO640 on cloudy days or when I go deeper under the surface (such as for mantas)

My shutter speed stays at 1/250sec  or more . You must be able to shoot at a shutter speed fast enough to freeze the action.

Mostly I shoot manual adjusting the aperture to suit the conditions.  Shutter Priority would be a 2nd choice to full manual

My Canon 5D IV has very good options for pattern metering mode.

Using the Ambient Light

I try to pick my subjects based on not shooting directly into the sun. This is not always successful, but if I can get a whale shark with the sun to my back it improves the chances for a great shot.

When swimming with whale sharks, you will want to be as mobile and nimble as possible. Since the whale sharks are feeding at the surface you can shoot entirely with ambient light.  As stated before, strobes are not permitted and would slow you down anyway.

Shooting Techniques

The whale sharks are swimming they could change direction at any moment, so pay very close attention to their movement to avoid touching them or being run over.

When using the wide angle lenses such as those with 180 degree coverage, watch that your fins do not get in the shot!

You do not need great freediving skills, but being able to stay underwater at 2 – 10 feet will give you a shooting angle of slightly upward and can help mitigate the effects of very bright and direct light.

Practice before your trip to increase your underwater time and clearing your ears. Even breath holding exercises on land can help you be prepared for the day.

Being able to freedive to 20 feet will give you the options of silhouettes and sun burst shots.

Types of Images to Try
Behavior

 Catching the wide open mouth during feeding either from the front, side, or ¾ angle

whale shark gills
Close up of whale shark gills

Whale Shark
Whale Shark, Mexico

Add drama to the feeding image by getting details of the water flowing into the mouth

Whale Shark
Whale shark feeding on the same food that the sardines enjoy

Position yourself ahead of the shark and wait for it to approach. While photographing, move off to the side to get ¾ angle as it goes by. If it is too late to move, quickly submerge and swim to the side letting it pass over you.  You do not want to get “bonked” – those fins are hard and rough.

One of the most dramatic images you can take of a whale shark is with its mouth wide open in the middle of feeding. This is common in Isla Mujeres, where the sharks shift into a vertical position to feed, called a “botella.” You will use every bit of your wide lens to capture this. The good part is that they are not moving while in this position.

Above and Below

When photographing the whale shark near the surface, try capturing a split shot with the fish underneath and the topside scene above. In some cases, the above subject might be boring: Just clouds or sky. But in other locations, you may be able to capture unique interaction with fishermen, either in a boat or on a floating platform.

swimming with whale sharks in the gulf of Mexico
Make a Complete and Varied Portfolio

Make sure to thoroughly describe your subject in both shape & form and behavior.

Check list:  Front, ¾, side, below, above, tail shot

snorkel with whale sharks in mexico
A whale shark feeding just below the surface
whale shark at the surface
A whale shark swims to our boat as it feeds with other whale sharks on a giant patch of plankton
whale shark bottle feeding
A whale shark goes vertical to do what they call “bottle feed” by pumping massive amounts of water into its mouth while staying stationary

You will get chances to get a tail shot as the whale shark swims past you into the distance.

Getting lower in the water, looking up that the subject adds variety and drama to your image collection.

If a whale shark is below the surface, get an image of its back from above. The spots are one of the most interesting features of the whale shark.

Shoot Silhouettes

Shooting up at the whale sharks creates a beautiful image. A whale shark is a unique shape (negative space) which makes a very interesting from above or from below shot.  To capture a sunburst, make sure to stop down your aperture (f8 on compact, f18 on mirrorless, f22 on DSLR) and use a fast  shutter speed to trim the amount of light getting in.

Take images with people as part of the composition

Remove distracting elements such as other people in water by moving off to a whale shark with no other people around it.  There are usually enough sharks around for everyone to get their own without getting too far from the boat.

Use a person for a sense of scale, but be careful to have them isolated against the water, not positioned between you and the whale shark so as to cover part of the subject. The best compositions will have the whale shark with a person below and behind or in front of the approaching whale shark.

Try adding a person to a silhouette. This will take some consultation with your model and a plan with signals and most likely several tries to get it right.

whale shark private charters for photographers
I free dive deep to get the entire whale shark framed into the shot
Whale Sharks are easily accessible and comparatively easy large marine subjects to photograph

The techniques are easily practiced and perfected while on my Whale Shark Photography Workshop.  With 4 days on the water we can experience all light conditions and move around to find the best areas of the aggregation and even search for mantas feeding on the same food patches. Back at the hotel, photographers have time and a safe place to download and review photos.  Shots missed can be attempted the next day and successes shared with others to inspire their next days shooting.  The little amount of equipment needed and streamlined snorkel kit make this trip easy to pack for. Abundant wildlife and the welcoming and fun nature of Isla Mujeres make this trip a must do for all underwater photographers.

Information about my Whale Shark and Manta Trips (and all of my photography trips) can be found on www.GregorySweeney.com

 

swim with giant manta rays

 

Whale Sharks in Mexico 2015 Trip Report

Private charter for whale sharks
Our boat captains are good at dropping us ahead of the moving whale sharks so as to get the front on shots

The 2015 whale shark season is not yet over, but I have returned from 2 great weeks with my guests and their whale shark experience.  We had great weather (one of the reasons I choose July) and whale shark encounters each day including several days with manta rays.

Isla-Mujeres-Mexico-3

 

whale shark private charters for photographers
I free dive deep to get the entire whale shark framed into the shot
A large whale shark
A large whale shark

Our first few days the whale sharks were feeding just under the water.  Over the next few days they were again feeding on the surface and easy to spot from in the water.  This also facilitated some great topside images.  The water color and clarity was variable as we tried different areas hoping to find mantas and whale sharks feeding on the surface. On occasion it was more blue-green and on other days we had crystal clear blue water.

A remora temporarily detached from its host
A remora temporarily detached from its host
snorkel with whale sharks in mexico
A whale shark feeding just below the surface

Being in the water with whale sharks teaches you much about their life and role in the environment.  One afternoon we witnessed schools of tevelli fish swimming close to the whale sharks; by their fins and mouths and even cowering underneath.  The reason because clear when I heard dolphin squeaks underwater.  A pod of 4 small but fast Atlantic spotted dolphin charged up to me, did 2 complete circles around me then raced on to confront the whale sharks.  I saw a few fish meet their demise.

Small fish take shelter from predators around and under the whale sharks
Small fish take shelter from predators around and under the whale sharks
Dolphins hunt for fish hiding among the feeding whale sharks
Dolphins hunt for fish hiding among the feeding whale sharks
swim with giant manta rays
A giant manta swims by feeding

The giant mantas are my favorite to photograph.  We would see the tell tale signs in the form of wingtips above the surface.  When we dove in they were coming from all directions feeding at about 1.5m below the surface.  Some had formed a convoy of 4 to 5 individuals all slowly flapping and scooping in food.  A few times I was present to photograph their looping up and down feeding.

giant manta rays
Mantas were swimming in groups and in line making large circles feeding

Each manta has a unique pattern on the underbelly.  I donate all images I can get of these identification markers to the Manta Trust so they might add to their Caribbean database.  It would be wonderful if some images from this season match individuals from last season.

Read my post about the Manta Trust Conservation and Caribbean Project 

whale shark gills
Close up of whale shark gills
Whale shark charters
Whale shark feeds at the surface around our boat
Whale shark charters for photographers
Keeping pace with a whale shark feeding is challenging but possible

Each day we left the dock in the morning and then returned in the mid afternoon around 3 or 4pm.  While on boat we had comfortable space, shade, sandwiches and snacks.  We could enjoy ourselves while the captain and crew placed us in the best areas for whale sharks and mantas.  All boat cooperate to take care of the wildlife by limiting numbers of boats and people in the water around each group of whale sharks.  At the conclusion of our swimming each day we enjoyed freshly ceviche specially prepared by the first mate before embarking back to Isla Mujeres.

Isla-Mujeres-Mexico-4 Isla-Mujeres-Mexico-5 Isla-Mujeres-Mexico-6

 

When not on the boat we had comfortable hotel rooms with plenty of public spaces for relaxing and connecting with wifi. Restaurants are plentiful and very good and most are very affordable.  We had many very excellent meals and the shopping was fun and diverse.

At the opposite end of the island is a part to explore and take in the rough coastline.

Isla-Mujeres-Mexico-1 Isla-Mujeres-Mexico-2

I will be hosting Whale Shark Trips again next year.  I have again secured great boats and crew and rooms at the Playa Media Luna.  Our boats are limited to 6 guests  so space is limited

Contact us   or Get More Information on my website

Swimming with & Photographing Whale Sharks